2011 World Cup Memories

November 7, 2019

by — Posted in qdeawd

first_imgJune 26 marks two years since Australia claimed the 2011 Federation of International Touch (FIT) World Cup in Scotland, winning five of the seven divisions contested at the event. To commemorate this fantastic achievement, www.austouch.com.au caught up with some of the Australian representatives that competed in the event, to speak about their experience at the World Cup and reflect on their winning performances.There are plenty of great memories when it comes to the 2011 World Cup finals –  the Australian Mixed Open team coming from behind to claim their first World Cup title since 2003, the Men’s 30’s comprehensive win in their final over England, the Men’s 35’s win over South Africa, the Australian Women’s side’s two touchdown win over archrivals New Zealand, as well as the thrilling Men’s Open final, which saw Australia reduced to five players with just minutes remaining in the game.  Join us as we catch up with some of the players who take us back to the final day of the 2011 World Cup in Edinburgh, Scotland.  Jamie StoweJamie Stowe can now look back at that epic last few minutes of defence in the Men’s final and view it as a ‘fairy tale finish’ to his Men’s Open career, however he recalls how important defending that set was to the outcome of the game.“I knew if we could defend this one set we had it won,” Stowe said.“The Kiwis attacked our right side, to bring it back for a set play on the left. That failed, due to us having five and our middle, Nathan Jones making the previous touch they threw the ball from the ground to an awaiting player who raced Nathan to the line.” “To this day I have never witnessed a more important touch in the history of the game. Nathan turned and took four large strides and then his trademark sideways dive to prevent the game going into a drop-off. We manage to squeeze three touches in down the field before the final whistle went.”Having played in two previous World Cups, Stowe said that the standard of Touch Football was improving around the world, with games becoming more competitive than ever. “Teams like Scotland, South Africa and Japan have come leaps and bounds and it’s great to see the game so healthy.”Scott Buckley Representing Australia in the Men’s Open team, Buckley scored a touchdown early in the Grand Final against New Zealand. He had one of the most nerve-wracking finals of the entire contingent, when he was sent for a period of time in the final minutes of the game, with the Australian team left to defend a full New Zealand attacking set close to their line. “I’ve never been so nervous in my life…I remember being filthy at the call sitting there just hoping the boys could hold off,” Buckley said. “Even when the hooter went for the full-time siren I thought it was only half-time and only when I saw everyone rejoicing I realised that was it.”  The game finished at 7-6 to Australia.While the time out of the game wase tough he said it made the victory ‘sweeter’ once it was completed.Buckley also has fond memories of the event outside of the final.“[My] favourite memories of World Cup would have to be running out for the World Cup final in front of a massive crowd, soaking up the whole tournament, meeting new people from all over the world and then of course travelling after it,” he said.Kylie HilderFor Australian Mixed Open representative, Kylie Hilder, the fact that she was even playing in the World Cup was special and winning the title made it all the more memorable.  “I was just getting back into playing Touch after the birth of my second son and had no intentions of playing for Australia again as I had actually retired. I played New South Wales State Cup at Port Macquarie and was actually at an Australian Women’s Rugby League camp at Runaway Bay when the captain of the Mixed squad, Ryan Pollock spotted me,” Hilder said. “We got talking and he then asked if I would be interested in playing Touch again at an elite level as he and the coach had seen me play at State Cup. From there I played National Touch League where the coach Bernie Morrison approached me and asked if I would be interested in joining the Mixed squad. It then just went from there.” “It was so different this World Cup as I had two sons, meaning a very busy life and I appreciated wearing the green and gold so much more. This I put down to priorities in life change and being able to play for my country again was so unexpected and I wasn’t taking anything for granted.”The 2011 World Cup was Hilder’s third World Cup win, having won titles with the Australian Women’s Open team in 2003 and 2007. The commitment she had made as well as the fact that she had come out of retirement made the achievement so much more special.  “It meant so much knowing that this whole experience had really come out of the blue to start with. I appreciated my selection more and soaked up every moment. I was playing Mixed which was a whole new experience for me after playing Women’s at the last two, so that to start with was a daunting thought. Mixed is such a different game and knowing that New Zealand had been so successful in that division for a little while, it was always going to be a big challenge.”“The win was so good and especially after New Zealand had beaten us in the round games. Playing in the two previous World Cups where the Women’s were always the favourites it was a strange feeling playing in the green and gold knowing that we were actually the underdogs and we had to take the Cup from New Zealand.”“Having two young boys at home and a husband that had been so supportive of me during the whole campaign with all the training weekends and then being away for the two weeks playing, bringing home the World Cup really made all that time away worthwhile.”   Louise WinchesterThe Australian Women’s Open team continued its impeccable World Cup record in Scotland, continuing their undefeated streak at a World Cup level. What made the event even more special for Louise Winchester was captaining her country at a World Cup for the first time as well as being named as one of the flag bearers for the event. “It was the first time I was captain at a World Cup and to receive the enormous privilege of being Flag Bearer for our country, amongst so many incredible players and people, both past and present was the greatest honour I have received. I will never forget that whole experience and I will never ever forget the way my team mates made me feel that day. It is a memory that I will cherish and be indebted to them forever. To make it even more special and emotional, when my Mum and Dad found out I was Flag Bearer they decided to surprise me and make the trip to Scotland. To experience this great honour in front of the two most special people in my life meant the absolute world to me,” Winchester said. Having gone through seven World Cups undefeated, the importance of the Australian Women’s Open legacy isn’t lost on the current side. “We had spoken of our great record and our tradition throughout the lead up and as a team we are very aware of the past players of the Women’s Open division and the amazing legacy they have left us. We are all very honoured to carry on the hard work and the success of these great teams and to do our part in continuing this and even though there is definitely some pressure that comes with this great success it is also something that we continually pride ourselves on and something that helps us fight even harder for it. I could not have been any prouder of the girls in winning this World Cup.”Kristy JuddBeing selected to represent Australia at one World Cup is a massive achievement and Australian Women’s Open player, Kristy Judd created history in Edinburgh, competing in her fifth World Cup at an Open’s level. This achievement is something Judd never thought too much about in the lead up but says she is proud of the achievement.  “Looking back now I am proud to say I played in five World Cups at the Women’s Open level. I’ve had great coaches along the way as well and made great friends. It was also a challenge to adapt to the way the game keeps changing which I think is a good thing and something that you see in every sport,” Judd said. Judd says her most recent World Cup win was memorable and a fantastic opportunity overall. “It was obviously great to come away with a win in such a huge tournament and a great way to finish what we had all been preparing for over the previous four years. Meeting players from the others teams was a highlight too, that’s what’s great about World Cups, it’s not just Australia versus New Zealand, there’s so many other teams playing and trying their best and no matter what the result is they get so much out of playing teams they only get the chance to play every four years.”Phil GyemoreFor Australian Men’s 30’s representative, Phil Gyemore, the World Cup final win saw him and his long-time teammates, Gavin Shuker and Garry Sonda, claim their third World Cup title together, and they did it in style, defeating England 18-2 in the final. Gyemore says he has many fond memories of the event, including getting to captain his country for the first time as well as his side setting some impressive records along the way. “Playing in three winning World Cups with Gavin Shuker and Garry Sonda (is a highlight).  They are both inspirational players that have made a major contribution to the way that Touch Football is played today.”“(Another highlight was) being involved in creating a few World Cup records such as the highest score in a World Cup final in any division by beating England 18-2, beating Luxembourg 31-0 in our first round game and seeing Gavin Shuker score 11 touchdowns in the same game which was the most touchdowns scored by one player in any World Cup game.  He had plenty of help from his teammates in reaching that milestone which will be hard to beat.” While the side were comprehensive winners in the final, the World Cup final was still a very memorable experience for the whole side. “The World Cup final was the only game where we had all 14 players start and finish the game so it was unusual having everyone available despite a few of them carrying injuries.  This enabled everyone to have the breaks and recovery time in the interchange box which kept all players pretty fresh.  The feeling in the dressing room was special,” Gyemore said.“We had…players with plenty of World Cup and international experience and some that were ready to realise their dreams of being in a World Cup final for the first time. It was a good mix and we knew that England were happy just to reach the final with no World Cup finals experience. We knew that a good start was critical to the final outcome and once we got a good start we continued to dominate and keep the momentum.”Paul McPherson and John MoujalliFor Australian Men’s 35’s representatives, Paul McPherson and John Moujalli, representing Australia for the first time and winning a World Cup title was a dream come true. “The support for our players that missed the final was great and the anthem sensational. I remember scoring a touchdown and giving an ordinary fist pump that has been recorded on YouTube for posterity. Lots of photos and some champagne in the dressing room and being able to watch all the other teams as we were the second grand final of the day.” “Our team has had reunions since where we do a lot of back slapping and tell each other how good we are to keep the memories alive,” McPherson said. “To represent for the first time was an honour. I was representing not only Australia but all my family, friends and coaches who helped me achieve it,” Moujalli said. “What I remember about the final/win was the confidence we took into the game because we were so well prepared on and off the field. After we got to an early 3-0 lead it relaxed us even more and we really soaked up the occasion.”To relive the Australian World Cup victories, please visit the Touch Football Australia YouTube channel by clicking on the following link:http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3DF14C2BAAD56F2B Related LinksWorld Cup Memorieslast_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *