Remarks by Governor Tom Wolf at Martin Luther King Day of Service

first_imgRemarks by Governor Tom Wolf at Martin Luther King Day of Service SHARE Email Facebook Twitter January 18, 2016center_img Remarks 21st Annual Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of ServicePhiladelphia, PATRANSCRIPT:Good Morning and welcome to the 21st Annual Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service.I’m so honored to be able to welcome the 5,000 volunteers that will participate in this event here at Girard College today.Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service is the largest King Day event in the nation with over 135,000 people across the region participating in a service project.And today we honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., a servant leader dedicated to justice, equality and fairness.I’m reminded today about the importance of leadership in service to the citizens among us in most need.And of Dr. King’s urgent persistence in moving people of his time toward a better democracy.A democracy based on the ideals of leaders that preceded him.A system that leaders before him established here in Philadelphia.Where all men are created equal.And now, during our time, we continue that legacy in our work to make life better for citizens of our great state.We continue moving our government towards fairness and equality in opportunity.This day continues to inspire me and I’m thankful that I’m able to return as Governor and work shoulder to shoulder with so many of you.Because I know that there are thousands, hundreds of thousands in this region alone, that are coming together in service to others today.Thank you to all the organizations here today, and particularly Global Citizen and its president, Todd Bernstein.You all have truly given breadth and momentum to this movement, and Pennsylvania, the United States, and the world is all the better for I.###Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

Harold Black

first_imgHarold Black, 77, of Pensacola, Florida, formerly of Cincinnati passed away Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at the West Florida Hospital in Pensacola. He was born near Pleasant in Switzerland County on January 8, 1937 the son of Ernst and Margaret Harper Black. He was married to Judith Lester on August 23, 1958 and his wife of 57 years survives. Other survivors include one son Jeffery (Lori) Black of Cadiz, Kentucky; two daughters Debra (John) Weale of Columbus, Ohio, and Teresa (Mike) Varner of Pensacola; five grandchildren; four brothers Dilver Thayer of Lake City, Florida, David (Rita) Black of Cincinnati, Richard (Mary) Black of Cross Plains, and Roger (Terry) Black of Ft. Wayne; two sisters Phyllis (Harold) Taylor of Cincinnati, and Marilyn (Jerry) Wisher of Covington, Kentucky. He was preceded in death by his parents. Mr. Black was a 1957 graduate of Cross Plains High School and a 1962 graduate of Ball State University where received his BS degree in education. He was a 10 year veteran of the US Air Force during the Vietnam Era where he rose to the rank of Captain. During his stay in the Air Force he was stationed in Enid, Oklahoma, Amarillo, Texas, the United Kingdom, Salt Lake City, and San Francisco. For his service Harold received the National Defense Service Medal, USAF Outstanding Unit Award, and the USAF Longevity Service Award. In civilian life Harold worked for 25 years as a supervisor for Avon Manufacturing in Springdale, Ohio. He also worked as a purchasing manager for Cincinnati Machine Tool Services from 1996 to 2001 and from 2008 to 2009 worked for the Kentucky State Park Service as a camp ground director. He retired from Merchant Security in 2013. Funeral services will be held on Tuesday, March 15 at 1pm at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles with Pastor Jerry Brooks of the Benham United Methodist Church officiating. Burial will be in the Benham Cemetery with military graveside services by the Versailles American Legion. Visitation will be on Tuesday from 11am until time of services.Memorials may be given to the Versailles American Legion in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

Abia Warriors Goalkeeper Shot in Ibadan, Hospitalised

first_imgAbia Warriors goalkeeper Charles Tambe is currently receiving treatment at the University Teaching Hospital (UCH), Ibadan after he was shot by thugs on Friday.Tambe returned to Ibadan to reunite with his family following the suspension of the Nigeria Professional Football League due to the coronavirus pandemic.According to the statement issued by Abia Warriors’ sporting director Patrick Ngwaogwu, the former Shooting Stars and Lobi Stars goalkeeper was shot on his way for his morning exercise routine. “He is not a rascal. He went for his morning walk out at about 07:00 this morning in Apata area, Ibadan where he stays with his family,” Ngwaogwu said, per BSN Sport.“They accosted him and collected his wristwatch and handset. And shot him on the hand.“He is presently in UCH, receiving treatment. The club is very much on top of the situation.”Tambe joined the Umuahia-based outfit last September, and he recently appeared in a video posted by the club urging fans to stay safe amid the Covid-19 pandemic.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Podcast studying a hot spot of intellectual disability and questioning green lawns

first_imgAdam Kerfoot-Roberts/Flickr A small isolated town in Colombia is home to a large cluster of people with fragile X syndrome—a genetic disorder that leads to intellectual disability, physical abnormalities, and sometimes autism. Spectrum staff reporter Hannah Furfaro joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the history of fragile X in the town of Ricaurte and the future of the people who live there.Also this week, we talk about greening up grass. Lawns of green grass pervade urban areas all around the world, regardless of climate, but the cost of maintaining them may outweigh their benefits. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with Maria Ignatieva of The University of Western Australia in Perth and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala about how lawns can be transformed to contribute to a more sustainable future.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript of this episode (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Adam Kerfoot-Roberts/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more