Brodeur back to defend High Mountain 10K title

first_imgLast year’s men’s 10K winner, Andrew Brodeur, is back to defend his title in today’s 2015 High Mountain Coffee 10K in Williamsfield, Manchester.Danielle Tauro, the 2015 women’s champion, will be absent but another massive turnout from both local and overseas participants is anticipated again this year.Brodeur, from the Shore Athletic Club in New Jersey, United States, won last year’s 10K race in 31:38. The Duke University student was virtually unchallenged after the 3K mark as he romped to the title.With the inclusion of the 5K Walk, 5K Run and wheelchair race this year, the day’s activities will begin at 2 p.m. The main event, the 10K race, is set to start at 3:30 p.m.The High Mountain Coffee road race started in 1983 and is the island’s longest-running road race. It is also the foundation of many of the nation’s top past distant runners, including Mardrea Hyman, Kemoy Campbell and Natoya Goule.Meet chairman John Minott says the event continues to be a landmark in Jamaica’s road racing.”This is a wonderful event that we are extremely proud of. We have seen it grow in excitement and the involvement of not just participants but the Jamaican public on a whole. The race has contributed to the development of many Jamaican distant runners, through their participation from schools they attended, and a number of them have gone on to carve out running careers overseas,” he noted.More than $300,000 are up for grabs in cash and prizes. Adults will pay an entrance fee of $1,000 for all events. There is no fee for children.Knutsford Express has arranged a special fare for persons living in Kingston who wish to view or compete in the event. Same-day return is $2,900 while same-day one-way is $1,800.Proceeds from the race will go to the Mandeville Regional Hospital’s renal unit for the fourth straight year.last_img read more

Toyota gets into its first-pick schools, spends millions on AI

first_imgRelated Posts 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Toyota has announced a new partnership with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Stanford University, aimed at accelerating the development of artificial intelligence and robotics.The Japanese car maker will pump $50 million into newly formed research centers at MIT and Stanford. Any developments will be shared with Toyota, and could be adapted to the company’s self-driving program.See also: Toyota steers millions into U. Michigan AI projectToyota said it would start implementing self-driving features into its vehicles as soon as this year, but does not intend to remove the driver anytime soon. It wants driverless systems to work in all weathers, where low visibility might make it hard for a human to navigate.Both schools have successful programsStanford and MIT have both incubated successful driverless projects. nuTonomy, a startup testing driverless shuttles in Singapore, started out as a MIT lab project. Drive.AI and Zoox are startups created by Stanford students.Toyota is not the first automaker to work with universities to build artificial intelligence and robotics for cars. Uber poached a whole team of students from Carnegie Mellon University in Michigan in 2015 to work in its self-driving division.Artificial intelligence is extremely important for autonomous cars, as the system will be required to think like a human and make decisive decisions in seconds. Google’s self-driving division, Waymo, will make the car do most of the thinking internally, removing the possibility of a hacker taking over the car.Toyota has not detailed its own plans for its self-driving system. The company wants to take it step-by-step and does not see a total driverless future for at least 20 years.center_img David Curry Tags:#AI#artificial intelligence#Autonomous car#driverless#japan#MIT#robotics#Self-Driving#Stanford#toyota IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A…last_img read more