Russia to give SA nuclear training input

first_img12 August 2013 Russia’s State Nuclear Power Corporation, Rosatom, which is busy positioning itself in case South Africa decides to build new nuclear power plants, has signed an agreement with North West University that will see it getting involved in training nuclear industry specialists for the country. Rusatom Overseas, a Rosatom branch that specialises in the promotion of the corporation’s projects abroad, last week signed a memorandum of cooperation with North West University, the only institution in South Africa that offers postgraduate degrees in nuclear engineering. The memorandum envisions the development of collaboration programmes in research, exchanges of experts, joint seminars and the writing of textbooks. A joint working group is to draw up a list of projects for collaboration. “We are pleased to announce the signing of the MoU with our Russian colleagues,” said Professor Herman van Schalkwyk, rector of the Potchefstroom Campus of North West University. “We recognise that nuclear energy remains an important option for South Africa. “The intention is to explore the potential for future collaboration, ranging from education to specific technical projects in nuclear engineering, hydrogen technologies, energy, etc.” Jomart Aliyev, director-general of Rusatom Overseas, said the memorandum would promote the development of technical education in South Africa, while giving local researchers and scientists the opportunity to find out more about modern Russian technologies. Joint research and scientific developments, he said, would “provide a solid foundation for the development of Rosatom’s business relations in South Africa”. Russian President Vladimir Putin said after a meeting with South African President Jacob Zuma in Sochi in May that Russia was ready to assist South Africa in building up a comprehensive nuclear power engineering industry. South Africa’s Koeberg nuclear plant is the only nuclear power-generating facility on the African continent. South Africa’s Integrated Resources Plan (IRP) for 2010 to 2030, a 20-year projection on the country’s electricity supply and demand, envisages 9 600 MW of additional nuclear capacity by 2030. The plan is due to be reviewed soon. Speaking at the Africa Energy Indaba in Johannesburg in February, Energy Minister Dipuo Peters said South Africa planned to expand its use of nuclear power in a safe and secure way as a key part of the country’s move towards a diversified, low-carbon energy mix. “If we are serious about diversification towards a low carbon economy, we cannot belittle the role that natural gas and nuclear power can play in the realisation of that 2030 low-carbon energy vision,” Peters said. Rosatom is ranked fourth in the world for nuclear electricity generation, accounting for 17% of the world nuclear fuel market. It conducts 45% of the world’s uranium enrichment services, and is ranked the second in the world for uranium reserves and fourth for uranium production. The company last year opened a marketing office in Johannesburg, only its third such office after Ukraine and Singapore, and sent a high-level delegation to Durban to take part in the 5th BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) summit in March-April. SANews.gov.za-Itar-Tass, with additional reporting by SAinfolast_img read more

2011 New South Wales Junior State Cup Results

first_imgIn the 18’s Girls division, Penrith started strongly, taking the early lead, before Wagga hit back to trail by just one touchdown. But it was too little too late with Penrith taking the match 7-6. In the 18’s Boys division, Parramatta dominated for the majority of the game, and won convincingly, 7-2. Under 10’s Boys – McCall CupNewcastle City 7 defeated Parramatta 4Player of the Final – Kurt Donohue (Newcastle)Under 12’s Boys – Zabielo CupNewcastle 0 – Orange 0Newcastle and Orange are joint winners of the 12’s Boys division. Player of the Final – Matt Smith (Newcastle)Under 14’s Boys – Yiangou CupRyde Eastwood 5 defeated Penrith 2Under 16’s Boys – Wall CupPeninsula 11 defeated Wests 4Player of the Final – Ben NicholsUnder 18’s Boys – Galea CupParramatta 7 defeated Manly 2Player of the Final – Wesley Sefuiva (Parramatta)Under 18’s Girls – Rose CupPenrith 7 defeated Wagga Wagga 6Player of the Final – Madison Absolum (Wagga Wagga)Under 16’s Girls – Toohey CupNewcastle City 13 defeated Taren Point 4Player of the Final – Lily Goodchild (Newcastle)Under 14’s Girls – Taylor CupManly 11 defeated Newcastle 4Player of the Final – Georgia Toovey (Manly)Under 12’s Girls – Vassallo CupBerkeley Vale 5 defeated Manly Sea Eagles 2Player of the Final – Aliyah Paki (Manly)Under 10’s Girls – Tirado CupManly 13 defeated Ryde 0Player of the Final – Monique Mortimer (Manly)Club ChampionshipsFirst – Manly Sea Eagles Second – Newcastle CityThird – Parramatta Eels Fourth – Penrith PanthersFifth – Wagga WaggaStay tuned to the website for all highlights of the grand finals at the 2011 New South Wales Junior State Cup. For all of the results from the Junior State Cup, please visit the event website:http://www.sportingpulse.com/assoc_page.cgi?c=0-857-0-0-0last_img read more

a month agoMan City striker Aguero admits being Liverpool and Owen fan

first_imgMan City striker Aguero admits being Liverpool and Owen fanby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City striker Sergio Aguero admits he grew up a fan off Liverpool.And he says Michael Owen was his favourite striker.Aguero has been Manchester City’s main man for eight years, winning four Premier League titles in the process. His latest league triumph came at the expense of Liverpool, who were searching for their first in the competition. Owen revealed his own admiration for Aguero in his book when discussing the finishing of United striker Marcus Rashford.He argued: “Players like Robbie Fowler, Aguero or Harry Kane, these people who are obsessed with goals. I don’t think he is obsessed with goals.”It seems the respect is mutual, as Aguero wrote in his autobiography Born To Rise: “I’ve always liked Liverpool, maybe because I used to play for Independiente who also played in red.”As a kid, I wanted to be Michael Owen and when I saw him score that goal for England against Argentina I thought ‘you little sh**’! Even aged 10, I knew they couldn’t allow him that much space. He was a terrific player at that time.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Kentucky’s Players Given Custom Kobe 10’s For SEC Tournament, NCAA Tournament

first_imgA behind-the-basket shot of Rupp Arena during a game.LEXINGTON, KY – NOVEMBER 14: A general view of the Kentucky Wildcats game against the Grand Canyon Antelopes at Rupp Arena on November 14, 2014 in Lexington, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)Saturday, Kentucky capped off an undefeated regular season with a victory over rival Florida. As the team continues to march toward the goal of a 40-0 campaign, the players will be sporting some new gear in the postseason. Monday, Kentucky’s equipment Twitter account unveiled a photo of the new Kobe 10’s that the Wildcats will be wearing for both the SEC Tournament and the NCAA Tournament. They’re customized with “Kentucky” written on the inside.Players are getting custom Kobe 10s for the @KentuckyMBB post-season run from @nikebasketball! #31notdone #WeAreUK pic.twitter.com/E969CjIP7U— UK Equipment Staff (@UKequipment) March 9, 2015Duke was also given customized versions of the same shoe earlier this week.Friday, Kentucky, which earned a double-bye in the SEC Tournament, will get the winner of Alabama vs. Florida.last_img read more

Genting Hong Kong to Delist from Singapore Exchange

first_imgzoom Genting Hong Kong, a part of Genting Group, has received a green light from the Singapore Exchange Securities Trading Limited (SGX-ST) for its proposed voluntary delisting from the Main Board of the SGX-ST.Genting Hong Kong has a primary listing on the Main Board of the HKSE, and a secondary listing on the SGX-ST. Following the proposed delisting, the company will continue to maintain a primary listing on the Main Board of the HKSE.The company said that the move is in line with its strategic focus on its cruise ship business in Asia, in particular, North-Asia, as the company continues to undertake initiatives to tap the burgeoning growth potential in the Chinese market.“Genting Hong Kong’s proposed delisting from the SGX-ST comes after careful consideration and is in line with our growth strategy and plans to enhance value for all our shareholders in the long term. Maintaining a single primary listing on the Main Board of the HKSE will potentially increase the trading of the company’s shares on the HKSE, which will enhance the Company’s profile amongst North-Asian investors,” Tan Sri Lim Kok Thay, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Genting Hong Kong, said.“The consolidated trading of the company’s shares on the HKSE arising from the proposed delisting is also expected to increase the liquidity of such shares on the HKSE, thereby improving the effectiveness of any future capital raising activities to be undertaken by the company.”After the delisting, shares will only be traded on the HKSE, the company said, adding that the voting rights and entitlement to dividends of shareholders will not be affected by the proposed delisting.last_img read more

Insilico Medicine to present latest advances in drug development at Supply Side

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 2 2018Insilico Medicine, a Rockville-based company developing the end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing the next generation artificial intelligence, will present its latest advances in modern drug development at the Supply Side West Conference in Las Vegas, 8-9 of November.Artificial Intelligence techniques (AI), such as deep learning (DL), reinforcement learning (RL), and generative adversarial networks (GANs), – generating as much data as possible – can be used to invent entirely new products. At Insilico AI has been used as a powerful tool to identify targets for drug development, and with the ability to simulate and accelerate research processes, AI helps more drugs to be discovered and come to market quickly. The presentation will focus on the latest advances in artificial intelligence for discovery, development and real world evidence collection of geroprotectors.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapy”We were one of the first groups to start using AI to predict the effects of the nutraceuticals and launch a range of products with a nutraceutical company. We are happy to present our results at the Supply Side Conference, which gathers the key industry leaders. The topic of AI for drug development is rapidly gaining popularity, and we are happy to be at the leading edge of research and one of the innovation drivers in the area”, says Alex Zhavoronkov, Ph.D., Founder, and CEO of Insilico Medicine, Inc.In addition the company intends to announce a key research partnership with one of the leading organizations in evidence-based products for longevity biotechnology. Through its Young.AI system Insilico Medicine provides a range of research tools for the aging research community and enables a variety of research collaborations.Supply Side West Conference brings together the largest health&nutrition industry professionals focused on dietary supplement, beverage, functional food, personal care, and sports nutrition innovation to drive their innovation, growth, and profitability, with input from purchasing, product development, marketing, supply chain management and more. The Conference is held on 6-10 of November.Source: http://www.insilicomedicine.com/last_img read more

Noninvasive imaging tools to detect stable ischemic heart disease in women

first_img Source:http://cvia-journal.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 1 2019In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Special Issue on Women’s Cardiovascular Health, Volume 3, Number 4, 2019, Guest Editor Gladys P. Velarde) pp. 375-389(15); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0007 Viviany R. Taqueti from the Cardiovascular Imaging Program, Heart and Vascular Center, Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA reviews novel imaging approaches for the diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease in women.This article provides a valuable provocative insight into the importance of advanced noninvasive imaging tools like CCTA, PET, and CMR in enabling very sensitive assessments of anatomic atherosclerotic plaque burden, macro and micro-vessel related ischemia, and myocardial fibrosis respectively. The author emphasizes the importance of low coronary flow reserve (CFR) as a potential link to understanding the hidden biological risk of stable IHD among women where abnormal coronary reactivity often co-exists with diffuse, nonobstructive CAD, a phenotype more prevalent in women and less amenable to focal revascularization. The author explains how the pathophysiology of obstructive and nonobstructive coronary disease renders itself to a more accurate diagnosis with the appropriate utilization of these novel modalities.Conventional recommendations for diagnostic testing for the evaluation of stable ischemic heart disease in women have largely paralleled those in men. Although they are designed primarily for the identification of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), traditional approaches can lead to overtesting in women without differentiating who is truly at risk. Several unique factors related to the presentation, diagnosis, and underlying pathophysiology of stable ischemic heart disease in women necessitate a more specific approach to the assessment of their risk, complete with separate guidelines when appropriate. This article highlights how advanced noninvasive imaging tools, including cardiac computed tomography angiography, positron emission tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, are enabling very sensitive assessments of anatomic atherosclerotic plaque burden, macrovessel- and microvessel-related ischemia, and myocardial fibrosis, respectively. Moving forward, effective diagnostic testing will need to identify women at high risk of adverse cardiovascular events (not anatomically obstructive CAD per se) without overtesting those at low risk. Judicious application of novel imaging approaches will be critical to broadening the definitions of CAD and ischemia to better reflect the whole spectrum of pathological phenotypes in women, including nonobstructive CAD and coronary microvascular dysfunction, and aid in the development of needed evidence-based strategies for their management.This article forms part of a special issue on Women’s Cardiovascular Health, guest edited by Gladys P. Velarde. Recent decades have witnessed great progress in the treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Due to improved therapies, preventive strategies and increased public awareness, CVD (stroke, heart failure, ischemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and congenital heart disease) mortality has been on the decline over this span of time for both genders. Unfortunately, the decline has been less prominent for women, especially women of color. Once viewed as a man’s disease, CVD remains the leading cause of mortality for women in the United States and is responsible for a third of all deaths of women worldwide and half of all deaths of women over 50 years of age in developing countries. In the United States, CVD far outpaces all other causes of death, including all forms of cancer combined. The statistics are sobering with about one female death in the United States every 80 seconds from CVD. That represents close to 400,000 deaths per year according to the more recent statistics. Of these, more than one quarter of a million women will die this year from ischemic heart disease (IHD) which includes obstructive and non-obstructive coronary disease, and about 64% of women who die suddenly of IHD have no prior symptoms. Despite a significant number of females with known CVD and increased awareness among women of heart disease as their major health threat, a substantial proportion of women (46% as per the most recent American Heart Association survey) remain unaware of their cardiovascular risk and continue to fail to recognize its significance.Related StoriesRNA-binding protein SRSF3 appears to be key factor for proper heart contraction, survivalRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsThis lack of awareness is more profound (over 60% unaware) among women in higher-risk groups, racial and ethnic minorities, and has changed little in decades.Poorly understood sex/gender differences in pathobiologic mechanisms, clinical presentation, management and application of diagnostic and therapeutic and preventive strategies have contributed to this gap. A critically important factor has been the underrepresentation of women in CVD research to date. In fact, only one-third of CVD clinical trials report sex-specific results despite The Food and Drug Administration regulations requiring sex stratification data, as well as the National Institute of Health recommendations of increased inclusion of women in clinical trials. This makes it difficult for researchers and clinicians to draw accurate conclusions about sex differences in mechanisms of disease, accuracy of specific diagnostic modalities and risks or benefits of a particular drug or device for the treatment of women with CVD. Furthermore, physicians and other healthcare providers continue to underestimate women’s cardiovascular risk, in part because of utilization of traditional approaches which can lead to over-testing or inappropriate risk assessment without accurate differentiating who is truly at risk and inadequate use of preventive therapies for women.The goal of this special edition Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications is to shed some light on specific topics that dominate the spectrum of CVD in women.last_img read more

Over 100 children are having rotten teeth removed everyday says UK government

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDMar 7 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)NHS data has shown that over 100 children are having rotten teeth removed every day. The report has come as a shock to many, as it is well known that tooth decay is a preventable condition.Lyashenko Egor | ShutterstockThis report comes from the British Dental Association (BDA) and states that there was 14,545 tooth extractions between 2017-18 in English children under the age of five. Of these children, ninety percent of cases were due to premature tooth decay.Further surgeries caused by tooth decay are commonly carried out for children aged between six and ten, says the report. Overall, there have been 38,385 cases of tooth extractions due to decaying teeth among children and teenagers below the age of 19.Statistics reveal that there is a variation in the prevalence of tooth decay among children across the country. Children living in parts of Yorkshire and the North West, for example, are five times more likely to be hospitalized for tooth extractions compared to children living elsewhere in the country.Tooth decay rates are highest among children under the age of 5 years living in Rotherham, Doncaster, Barnsley, Sheffield, and Hyndburn. The BDA warns that the actual numbers may be much more than these figures because a large number may go unreported. Sources:Almost 9 out of 10 child hospital tooth extractions due to decay. Public Health England Press Release. 6th March 2019.PHE Oral Health Data Report. 2019. Children’s oral health shouldn’t be a postcode lottery, but these figures show just how wide the oral health gap between rich and poor has become. While Wales and Scotland have national programmes making real inroads, in England ministers are yet to commit a penny of new money to the challenge.This poverty of ambition is costing our NHS millions, even though tried-and-tested policies would pay for themselves. The Government’s own figures show a pound spent on prevention can yield over three back in savings on treatment.”Mick Armstrong, BDA chairmancenter_img Tooth decay is can be prevented by reducing sugar consumption, through the regular use of fluoridated toothpaste and routine visits to the dentist. The BDA  supports the expansion of the fluoridated water schemes that serve around 5.8 million people in England.Dr Sandra White, dental lead for Public Health English said in a statement, “Children are consuming far too much sugar each day, and this can have a very serious impact on their oral health. Parents can help reduce their children’s sugar intake by making simple swaps when shopping and making sure their children’s teeth are brushed twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Small, consistent changes like these can have the biggest impact on children’s teeth.”last_img read more

Jim Rossman We found your new favorite gadgets including a nifty way

first_img Citation: Jim Rossman: We found your new favorite gadgets, including a nifty way to carry keys and tools (2018, July 4) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-jim-rossman-favorite-gadgets-nifty.html Every so often I accumulate a desk full of gadgets that might not warrant a full review, so I save up a few and run them together. This particular group doesn’t really have anything in common, but I think each of these gadgets is worthy of your consideration. – Keyport PivotHow do you carry your keys?Almost everyone carries keys. I have car keys, house keys, gate keys, shed keys and work keys.I used to carry my keys on a ring. For a while, I hooked them onto a belt loop of my jeans.Lately I’ve been toting my keys on a Keyport Pivot. It’s kind of like a pocketknife, but instead of blades, it holds keys and more.Besides being a nifty way to hold your keys, the Keyport Pivot can also hold a multitool, a pocket knife, a flashlight, a pen, a flash drive and more.It all folds up into a neat bundle that will fit in your pocket a lot easier than all those items separately.The basic Keyport Pivot costs $19.99. You can add snap-on modules on either side such as a flashlight ($9.99) or knife ($16.99).The area that holds keys can also hold inserts including a pen ($8.99), a USB flash drive (starting at $12.99) and multitools ($12).Finally, you can add expansion kits to hold more keys or inserts for $9.99. – AirpocketThe Airpocket is a small bag designed to sit in the seatback pocket.I used to fly for work pretty frequently. Working in IT, I always carried my laptop bag on the plane, usually under the seat at my feet.That’s fine until you actually want to pull out your laptop during the flight and you need to be a contortionist to get things set up once your flight is underway.The Airpocket ($68, www.theairpocket.com) is an organizer bag that’s designed to fit in the seatback pocket for easy access.The Airpocket isn’t designed to replace your whole laptop bag. It is really only for the items you’ll need during your flight.My laptop is a 13-inch Macbook Pro, and it barely fits in the Airpocket. It is also perfect for magazines, books or your travel documents.It has a shoulder strap that’s long enough for me to comfortably carry it across my chest like a small messenger bag. It can also slip over the extended handle of your roller bag for a quick and secure trip through the airport.The Airpocket measures 12 by-10-by-2.5 inches, and it weighs 1 pound. It’s made of stretchy neoprene (like a wetsuit).I’ve been carrying my laptop to work in the Airpocket for the last few weeks. It’s not much bigger than my laptop, but I don’t need it to hold the power supply or other items.This would be a great gift for a frequent flyer. – TaoTronics LED desk lamp with wireless chargerI love gadgets that do more than one thing, and I have an iPhone 8 Plus, so imagine how happy I was to fiind the TaoTronics LED desk lamp with wireless charger ($41.99, www.amazon.com).We tend to keep the overhead lights off in my office, so we all have to provide our own light. I have a few LED lights around my cubicle, and the LED desk lamp with wireless charger looks right at home on my desk.The lamp has settings for five colors of light, from warm to cool (3000K-6500K), and seven brightness levels. Its output is 410 lumens of light—pretty close to a 40-watt bulb.The lamp rotates on the base and is adjustable in almost any direction.The round base houses a wireless phone charger that can fast-charge compatible Android phones at 10 watts. For compatible iPhones, the charge rate is 5 watts, which is slower, but it still does a decent job.The base is a great place to set the phone when I get to my desk.And, if you don’t have a phone with wireless charging, the lamp has a USB port on the back to charge other devices. Explore further Gadgets: Customizable tool puts order in your pocket ©2018 The Dallas Morning News Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

5 Strange Cool Things Weve Recently Learned About the Moon

first_img Gallery: The Fantastic Full Moon A stunning shot of the 2017 total solar eclipse as soon from the Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Credit: Carla Thomas/NASA/BBC America 2. There’s an enormous, dense blob of metal below the surface of the moon’s south pole. Deep below the moon’s South Pole-Aitken basin (the largest preserved impact crater anywhere in the solar system), researchers have detected a gargantuan “anomaly” of heavy metal lodged in the mantle that is apparently altering the moon’s gravitational field. According to a study of the mysterious blob, published April 5 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, the anomaly likely weighs somewhere in the neighborhood of 2.4 quadrillion tons (2.18 quintillion kilograms). The researchers aren’t sure how this giant blob of metal got itself trapped below the lunar surface. Simulations suggest it could be the heavy remnants of the iron-nickel asteroid that crashed into the far side of the moon and created the giant South Pole-Aitken crater some 4 billion years ago. [Read more about the massive blob beneath the moon.] See Spectacular Lunar Mission Images in 3D (Photos) 5. The moon is two-faced (probably because of a massive asteroid). Ours is a moon with two faces: the nearside boasts a thinner and smoother crust, while the farside crust is thicker and dotted by impact craters left nearly undisturbed by lava flows. The discrepancies have vexed scientists for decades, and in a new paper, researchers use models to explore what may be possible explanations for the stark differences. They argue that those distinctive sides could be the result of a giant impactor slamming into the moon and leaving a massive crater across the entire nearside. [Read more about what created the moon’s two faces.] Discover more fascinating facts about the moon with BBC America’s “Wonders of the Moon,” premiering Friday, July 19 at 10 p.m. EDT/9 p.m. CDT. A burnt-orange moon hangs over London. Although scientists have unraveled many of the moon’s mysteries in the 50 years since Apollo 11, mankind’s enchantment with our nearest neighbor has never dimmed. Credit: James Burns/BBC America 1. There is water on the moon, and it jumps around. In 2009, data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) led to the discovery of water on the moon locked up in ice. A recent upgrade to the orbiter, called the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), has allowed scientists to take a closer look at the water on the lunar surface. LAMP has revealed that water molecules move around the moon as the lunar surface warms and cools throughout the day. Water remains stuck on the moon’s surface until the lunar midday, when some of the water melts and heats up enough to lift into the moon’s delicate atmosphere. The water floats around a bit until it reaches an area cool enough to make it settle back down to the surface.Advertisement Water on other planetary bodies could be a valuable resource for human explorers to not only drink but also to serve as fuel for future robotic exploration, since water can be split to form rocket fuel, saving missions from having to carry that fuel from Earth. [Read more about how water hops around the moon.] Find Apollo 11 Landing Site While Skywatching The MoonFor the 50th anniversary of humanity’s first steps on the lunar surface, learn 5 facts about our moon and where to find the Apollo 11 landing site while viewing it in the night sky. Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65943-strange-facts-about-the-moon.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0003:1903:19Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?02:31Surgical Robotics00:29Video – Giggly Robot关闭  It’s been almost 50 years since a human first set foot on the moon. Since then, our knowledge about Earth’s closest neighbor has improved by leaps and bounds, and our obsession with it has never waned. Witness some of the most amazing images of the moon ever recorded and be reminded of the significant influence of our moon in BBC America’s new documentary “Wonders of the Moon,” premiering Friday, July 19 at 10 p.m. EDT/9 p.m. CDT. As the world begins its commemoration of the awe-inspiring first walk on the lunar surface, let’s review five of the most recent and fascinating scientific findings about the moon.center_img A beautiful bright moon illuminates Brecon Beacons National Park in Wales, UK. Credit: Allyn Wallace/BBC America Photos: Mysterious Objects on the Moon 4. You won’t strike it rich on the moon. Gold, platinum and other metals known as highly siderophile (“iron-loving”) elements are far more abundant in Earth’s crust than they are in its natural satellite. That may seem odd, given the two worlds’ shared history. About 4.5 billion years ago, a Mars-size planet dubbed Theia slammed into the proto-Earth, blasting huge amounts of material from both bodies into space. Some of this liberated stuff was incorporated into the bruised and battered Earth, and some coalesced to form the moon. But highly siderophile elements (HSEs) appear to have been left out of the mix. These metals were likely delivered by later asteroid strikes — but why does Earth have so much more than the moon? The researchers suspect that the moon’s weaker gravitational pull means material delivered via impact isn’t as likely to have stayed on the moon as it did on Earth — lots of stuff that hits the moon returns to space. The small concentration of HSEs retained on the moon likely arrived before the moon’s magma ocean cooled and solidified, so the material became incorporated into the moon’s core. [Read more about why Earth has way more gold than the moon.] The International Space Station’s incredible view of the moon. Credit: Luca Parmitano/BBC America 3. The moon is shrinking and quaking. The moon is shrinking. And as the crust of our lone satellite contracts, it tugs on cliff-like cracks on the surface, leading to lots of moonquakes, researchers have discovered. Scientists revisited moonquake data gathered from 1969 to 1977 by seismic equipment on the Apollo lunar missions. They mapped the seismic data to satellite images of thrust faults, or scarps — stairstep cliffs on the lunar surface. These formations stand dozens of feet high and extend for miles, and they are visible in images captured by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The researchers discovered that around 25% of the moonquakes were likely generated by released energy from these faults, rather than by asteroid impacts or activity deep inside the moon. Scarps are spread across the face of the moon in a vast, global network, and are estimated to be no more than 50 million years old, the researchers wrote. The age and distribution of the scarps hint that they appeared as the moon’s interior cooled down, causing its crust to contract. [Read more about the moonquakes] Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GameIf You’re Over 40 And Own A Computer, This Game Is A Must-Have!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoDr. Marty Nature's Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat Food3 Signs Something’s Wrong Inside Your Cat’s BodyDr. Marty Nature’s Feast Freeze-Dried RAW Cat FoodUndoClassmatesSearch For Any High School Yearbook, It’s Free.ClassmatesUndoGundry MD SupplementsTop Cardiologist: This One Thing Will Properly Flush Out Your BowelsGundry MD SupplementsUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoMarie Claire | HanacureMeet The Beauty Equivalent To TIME’s Person Of The Year AwardMarie Claire | HanacureUndolast_img read more