Halfpenny steers Toulon into final

first_img The Wales full-back booted six penalties and a conversion of wing Bryan Habana’s interception try midway through the additional 20 minutes as Toulon triumphed 25-20 to book a Twickenham final appointment with fellow French heavyweights Clermont Auvergne on May 2. Leinster gave as good as they got for most of the contest, with centre Ian Madigan kicking five penalties and flanker Sean O’Brien scoring a late try, but it was Madigan’s pass that South African speedster Habana intercepted to see Toulon home. Toulon, bidding to become the first team in 20 years of European knockout club rugby to win three successive tournaments, were pushed all the way by a Leinster side that delivered its best performance of this season’s competition. Ultimately, though, they were left to reflect on what might have been, conceding 13 points during extra-time after holding Toulon 12-12 after 80 minutes. But Toulon will need to deliver a far more clinical display if they are to threaten Clermont in what will be a repeat of the 2013 European final. England international Steffon Armitage had to be content with a place on the Toulon bench, providing cover for the back-row trio of Juan Smith, Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe and Chris Masoe, while Matt Giteau partnered Mathieu Bastareaud in a midfield of contrasting styles. Leinster, meanwhile, fielded an unchanged team from the side that edged past quarter-final opponents Bath two weeks ago as they looked to reach a fourth European final in the past seven seasons. Toulon exerted pressure from the start, and they almost went ahead after five minutes when a steepling Frederic Michalak kick failed to be gathered by Leinster wing Fergus McFadden or full-back Rob Kearney, and Toulon skipper Chris Masoe touched down. Referee Wayne Barnes, though, brought play back for an early infringement after playing advantage, and Halfpenny booted Toulon ahead. But the lead proved to be short-lived as Madigan passed 100 points in Europe this season with an angled penalty that tied things up, and he landed two further penalties during a four-minute spell that left Toulon with food for thought. Leigh Halfpenny kicked Toulon into the Champions Cup final at Twickenham next month and kept his team on course for an unprecedented European title hat-trick following an extra-time finish at Stade Velodrome. Leinster did not to need to do anything spectacular, it was more a case of keeping pressure on Toulon and making them concede penalties, with Madigan in the mood to gratefully accept his opportunities. Halfpenny narrowed the deficit via his second successful penalty 11 minutes before half-time, and there remained little to enthuse the crowd in terms of attacking rugby, as both teams seemed intent on trying to dominate midfield exchanges. Armitage entered the action five minutes before half-time, replacing an injured Smith, but Leinster still held the advantage, having rarely been threatened by a Toulon team that often built solidly, yet lacked a final thrust. Michalak, who had failed to spark Toulon during the opening half, lasted just eight minutes of the second period before being subsituted, with head coach Bernard Laporte sending on Rudi Wolf and moving Matt Giteau from inside centre to fly-half. Halfpenny then missed a difficult penalty, but he made amends with a 55th-minute penalty that drew Toulon level and at least breathed life into a game riddled by errors and that cried out for some attacking initiative. Leinster continued to absorb Toulon’s somewhat limited attacking game, and as the clock ticked down, it became a battle of wits and which team could control its nerve. Madigan showed signs of cracking when a penalty attempt 15 minutes from time hit the post, which gave Toulon an opportunity to counter-attack, forcing their opponents into some frantic defending. Leinster kept their defensive line intact, but they were punished at the breakdown by Barnes, and Halfpenny’s fourth successful penalty made it 12-9. But Madigan continued to match his fellow marksman blow for blow, finding his range from just inside Toulon’s half with a superb strike that levelled things up once more entering the closing 10 minutes. Gopperth had a chance to win it for Leinster with two minutes of normal time remaining, but his drop-goal attempt drifted agonisingly wide, then Armitage landed a final-kick penalty well short, which meant 20 minutes’ extra-time. Halfpenny and Madigan exchanged further penalties during the early flurries of extra-time, before Toulon’s New Zealand World Cup-winning lock Ali Williams was sin-binned for taking out rival lock Devin Toner in the air from a restart. It appeared a harsh call by Barnes, yet Toulon galvanised themselves via another Halfpenny penalty and Habana’s breakaway score that finally broke Leinster, even though O’Brien crashed over from close range with five minutes left. Press Associationlast_img read more

USC professor presents her new book on food in LA

first_imgAssistant Professor Sarah Portnoy hosted an event on Tuesday to celebrate her new book, Food, Health, and Culture in Latino Los Angeles. The book highlights the rich history of Latino cuisine in Los Angeles, the contemporary Latino food scene and the various struggles for food justice the Latino community faces, especially in South Los Angeles.Only 200 miles from the Mexican border, Los Angeles has the largest Latino population in the United States. Portnoy, however, explained that this isn’t the only Latino influence in Los Angeles. Immigrants from Central and South America have made their mark on the city, and because of this, Latino food has skyrocketed in popularity.“Latino cuisine in Los Angeles is more interesting and innovative than ever,” Portnoy said. “Mexican food is by far one of the most popular, complex and widely available cuisines, but Southern Californians are also branching out and exploring cuisines from Peru, Argentina, El Salvador and beyond, as well as Mexican-influenced fusion flavors that range from sushi burritos to kimchi quesadillas.”Portnoy said that despite the popularity of Latino cuisine and chefs, there continues to be a divide between the quality and healthiness of food available at restaurants and food trucks and what is available in food deserts like South Los Angeles, which is home to many low-income and urban Latinos. According to Portnoy, in South Los Angeles, grocery stores only make up two percent of all food options causing the majority of the population to turn to unhealthy and fast food alternatives. This has led to 70 percent of adult Latinos and 35 percent of children in some communities to become obese. Several community-based organizations in attendance explained the difficulties in accessing healthier options and their efforts to combat the lack of healthy food, diabetes and obesity by establishing community gardens and programs.Kathryn Kocarnik, co-director of Garden School Foundation, an interdisciplinary program of education that teaches garden-based learning at elementary schools, explained that children love their communities, learning about healthy eating and creating their own urban gardens.“A lot of our students don’t have access to land where they can get their hands dirty,” Kocarnik said. “The kids talk about coming into the garden, and they talk about wanting to come to school because they can go into the garden.”Similarly, directors at community-oriented organizations Groceryships and With Love Market and Cafe explained the astounding impacts that health education has on the low-income Latino population.“The heart of our program is a 20-week model, teaching about not just nutrition but building community around healthy lifestyles,” Dana Rizer of Groceryships said. “Based on this understanding that health is not just physical, health is emotional, health is mental. A lot of the decisions we make about food come from very emotional places. They also come from very real economic places. So, it doesn’t really work to teach people that eating more vegetables is the healthy thing to do. We have to integrate it with the cultures that we’re working with.”Karla Vasquez, director of community programs at With Love Market and Cafe explained the goals of their community project.“We’re here to provide opportunities for our neighborhood and our community to be healthy in as many ways as possible,” Vasquez said. “We do host community cooking classes. We do have a free yoga class Mondays at 6 p.m. But, we also make an effort to create opportunities for creative outlets like open mics so individuals can share what’s on their hearts. These outlets make a real big difference. It’s empowering a community.”last_img read more

Syracuse men’s basketball opponent preview: What to know about Iona

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 13, 2017 at 9:40 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Syracuse (1-0) faces one of its more difficult nonconference opponents of the season Tuesday night, when Iona (0-1) visits the Carrier Dome for a 7 p.m. tipoff. The Orange is coming off a season-opening victory over Jimmy Boeheim and Cornell, while the Gaels lost at Albany by two points last week. Iona won the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference title last season and lost in the first round of the NCAA Tournament to Oregon.Here’s what you need to know about Iona before Tuesday night’s matchup.All-time series: Syracuse leads, 4-0Last time they played: On Dec. 18, 2010 in the Carrier Dome, SU snuck out an 83-77 victory that bumped the Orange to a perfect 11-0 record. Kris Joseph scored 21 points, Brandon Triche had 14 and Scoop Jardine added 11.The Iona Report: The Gaels are an up-tempo, 3-point heavy team that finished 22-13 overall and 12-8 in conference a year ago. They earned a No. 14 seed in the NCAA Tournament. Head coach Tim Cluess enters his eighth season at the helm of the New Rochelle, New York, school, which led the country in points per game in both the 2011-12 and 2013-14 seasons. His offense thrives on the 3-point shot — Iona led the country in 3s made (344) in 2014-15.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIona has lost its top three scorers and top two rebounders from last season. Tulsa graduate transfer and 6-foot-8 forward TK Edogi led Iona with 17 points on 8-for-10 shooting and had nine rebounds last week at Albany. He could prove difficult for an inexperienced SU frontcourt. Edogi appears to be one of Iona’s potent offensive threats, along with Deyshonee Much, who scored 15 in the opener.Roland Griffin also brings experience to the frontcourt. He played at Illinois State and Midland College before arriving at Iona this season. At 6-foot-7, 215 pounds, he brings size off the bench. Meanwhile, in the backcourt, Massachussetts transfer Zach Lewis comes as an All-MAAC honoree at Canisius, his previous stop. He averaged 8.8 points per game with the Minutemen.Andy Mendes | Digital Design EditorHow Syracuse beats Iona: Avoiding a slow first few minutes is key, because the Gaels can run up and down the court and shoot it from deep to get a lead. Iona has historically struggled on the glass, but it can stay in games when it gets hot from 3. The Gaels’ success Tuesday likely hinges on how consistent it shoots. If it can shoot well, Iona can keep the game in single-digits.Iona will try to push the basketball and beat the 2-3 zone up the floor with transition buckets and quick 3s. As long as SU’s shot selection is consistently smart and at least two players get back on defense to stop the fast break, the Orange should have control of this game.Stat to know: 22The No. 5 seed Orange beat No. 12 Iona in the 1998 NCAA Tournament on a 22-foot buzzer-beater to win, 63-61. Syracuse ran a play for senior forward Todd Burgan. Burgan drove into the lane but had his shot blocked by Iona’s center. Burgan found the basketball, passed to Marius Janulis, who was alone at the top of the key to hit the game-winner.Player to watch: TK Edogi, forward, No. 13Edogi, a 6-foot-8 graduate transfer from Tulsa, scored 17 points in the opener last week to lead the Gaels. He averaged only 4.2 points per game last season and only played about eight minutes per game before that, but he’s experienced and brings size that SU’s bigs will have to defend. Commentslast_img read more