Theoretical Physics Faculty Positions Johns Hopkins University

first_imgThe Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins Universityexpects to fill at least one tenure-track or tenured facultyposition in theoretical particle physics, mathematical physics,cosmology, particle astrophysics, or gravitational physics, broadlyconstrued. Preference will be given to candidates forjunior-faculty positions, but candidates for tenured appointmentswill be considered in exceptional circumstances. The successfulcandidates will be expected to maintain active research programsand to teach at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, a list ofpublications, and short description of research plans viaInterfolio to http://apply.interfolio.com/46795 . Applicants who wishto be considered at the level of assistant professor should havethree letters of recommendation submitted on their behalf to thesame address. If you have questions concerning Interfolio, pleasecall (877) 997-8807 or email [email protected] You may alsocontact Pam Carmen at (410) 516-7346 or [email protected] of applications will begin on December 1, 2017, andwill continue until the position is filled. Johns HopkinsUniversity is committed to active recruitment of a diverse facultyand student body. The University is an Affirmative Action/EqualOpportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans andindividuals with disabilities and encourages applications fromthese and, other protected group members. Consistent with theUniversity’s goals of achieving excellence in all areas, we willassess the comprehensive qualifications of each applicant.The Johns Hopkins University is committed to equal opportunity forits faculty, staff, and students. To that end, the university doesnot discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, marital status,pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age,disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, veteran status or other legally protectedcharacteristic. The university is committed to providing qualifiedindividuals access to all academic and employment programs,benefits and activities on the basis of demonstrated ability,performance and merit without regard to personal factors that areirrelevant to the program involved.The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfmlast_img read more

Research Associate – Molecular Nutrition/Nutritional Biochemistry

first_imgThe research associate will participate in the design,implementation, and evaluation of research studies; monitorexpenditure of research funds with PI; develop, update and revisestandard operating procedures; perform training duties; attend andparticipate in meetings, conferences and training groups; andassist in supervising student research. The position will alsoassist in the development of proposals to funding agencies; developand supervise the development of methods, techniques, andinstrumentation needed to carry out research projects and results;analyze and evaluate research results; write progress reports andfinal reports on completion of research projects; and author andco-author manuscripts for publication and/or presentation atprofessional meetings and other duties as assigned.last_img read more

Associate Director for Constituent Engagement, Alumni Relations

first_img Manager of Programs & Special Projects Save Supervisory Case Manager Salary Not Specified Share Facebook More searches like this Business & Administrative Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Washington D.C. Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Salary Not Specified Save Dir Comm/Mkt-Innovation Campus Twitter District of Columbia, United States You need to sign in or create an account to save You need to sign in or create an account to save Similar jobs District of Columbia, United States JH at SAIS -Washington DC Virginia Tech Johns Hopkins School of Advanced InternationalStudies (SAIS) is seeking an experienced professional to serve asAssociate Director for Constituent Engagement, Alumni Relations, inthe Office of Development and Alumni Relations. This position willbe responsible for planning, developing and implementing programsand activities aimed at growing our alumni and supporter base,building alumni support, and enhancing alumni and supporterinvolvement and participation. Working under the supervision of theDirector of Constituent Engagement, the person serving in thisposition will manage, implement and direct all aspects of theexternal alumni relations program forSAIS.Essential Duties andResponsibilities:Manage all regional,international and affinity-based alumni groups by providing supportin planning, promoting and implementing a variety of events and astrategic alumni relationsprogram.Manage and updateguidelines, roles and responsibilities, and training forprogramming for volunteerleaders.Create opportunitiesfor meaningful engagement of alumni with current students, anddevelop programming to engage alumni through volunteer efforts withthe SAIS Admissions, Student Services and Global Careersoffices.Work closely with theDirector of Constituent Engagement to develop, coordinate, andimplement programming and campaigns to deepen alumni engagement,support the efforts of the development officers and, secure annualrevenue for the Office of Development and AlumniRelations.Respond to inquiries by alumni, internalstakeholders, and advancement colleagues, and assists when possibleandappropriate.Perform other dutiesas assigned.Qualifications:A Bachelor’s degree or higher plus three to fouryears of related experience, or an equivalent combination ofeducation andexperience.A proven and energetic relationship builder withexperience working with experience in effectively managingvolunteer groups, executing programming and specialevents.Ability to function efficiently and as a self-starterin a complex organizational environment demanding high energy,discretion, patience, enthusiasm, andcreativity.Knowledge of creating and monitoring event budgets aplus. Flexibility to attend evening and/or weekend events and totravel on an as neededbasis.Ability to manage several projects simultaneously andprioritize workload. Must be detail oriented and able to completeprojects while adhering to aggressivedeadlines.Strong verbal/written communication and proofreadingskills.Must possess exemplary interpersonal skills anddemonstrate a genuine appreciation in working with diverseaudiences and in a teamsetting.Ability to maintain strictconfidentiality.TimeMatrix:40% – Executing and managing alumni volunteer leadergroups, alumni relations programming andevents25% – Creating communications for, and outreach to,alumni constituencygroups15% – Cultivating new relationships with currentstudents, faculty, and alumni through targeted outreach effortswith gift officers, across departments of the School, andJHU10% – Fielding responses to alumni inquiries,internal stakeholders, and providing resources to alumni inneed10% -Coordinate thedaily operations of the alumni relationsprogram District of Columbia, United States Salary Not Specified Dir Comm/Mkt-Innovation Campus Supervisory Case Manager Save Manager of Programs & Special Projects University of the District of Columbia You need to sign in or create an account to save University of the District of Columbia Communications Not specified Full Time jobs in Washington D.C. Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Washington D.C. Faculty Positions Not specified Full Time jobs in Washington D.C. Public Relations & Advertising Not specified Full Time jobs in Washington D.C. LinkedInlast_img read more

Theatre Ensemble presents show for children

first_imgHOBOKEN – The Hudson Theatre Ensemble’s Silly on Sixth Children’s Series presents “Sing Me A Story with Sue!” at the Hudson School Performance Space, 601 Park Ave., Hoboken, onSunday, Nov. 19 at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 25, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.The show runs about 40 minutes and is suitable for children aged 2 to 10. All tickets are $10.For reservations, call (201) 377-7014 or [email protected] if your child has a November birthday, incorporate Silly on Sixth into your birthday plans. The entire audience will sing Happy Birthday to your child, the kids meet the actors after the show, and you can take photos of your child with the actors. Call Florence for details at (201) 377-7014.last_img read more

O.C. Drubs Absegami to Stay Undefeated

first_imgBy TIM KELLYThe beat goes on. As do the beatings.Ocean City’s swarming defense and fast-paced offense featuring three rushing touchdowns from Isaac Wilson helped the Red Raiders swamp Absegami 44-6 Friday in a West Jersey Football League Independence Division clash.It was the fourth straight dominating performance for Ocean City (4-0 overall, 3-0 division), which yielded its first points of the season but was never seriously threatened by the Braves (0-3) at Carey Stadium.The Raiders’ offensive line rotation of Drew Eget, Chris Armstrong, Jack Baker, Michael Rhodes, Brad Jamison and Zach Mazzitelli blew ’Gami off the ball all night, allowing Wilson plenty of running room.“Our line was doing such a great job making holes, I could walk into them. I could walk right in,” said Wilson, a 5-9, 180-pound senior.“I’ve been focusing on patience, waiting for the play to develop in front of me,” Wilson continued. “I wrote the word ‘patience’ on my arm to remind me.”Wilson scored on runs of 6, 2, and 3 yards, and quarterback Joe Repetti threw three TD passes, giving him 11 for the season, including two to Jake Schneider of 13 and 8 yards, and a 24-yard hookup to tight end Jamison.Despite the offensive production, which resulted in scores on the Raiders’ first four possessions, Wilson said the Raider defense “sets the tone for our team. The offense gets energized watching our defense put us in a position to do what we can do.”Ocean City Head Coach Kevin Smith said Wilson had his breakout game on Friday as a result of paying more attention to running the ball north and south.“Isaac is getting better every week,” Smith said. “He is doing a much better job of squaring his shoulders. He used to run to the edge a lot more. Since he’s been (running downhill) he has been much more effective.”Smith said Ocean City’s 4-0 start was the Raiders’ first since 1998, when they went on to win the South Jersey Group II championship.The sun sets over Carey Stadium as Ocean City rolls to another big win to remain undefeated.There’s still room for improvement, Smith said, as the team became somewhat sloppy after it rolled to a 37-0 lead late in the second quarter. Several foolish penalties and minor defensive lapses are areas he addressed with the team in the postgame huddle and will strive to clean up as the season moves forward.Just before halftime, ’Gami had its only real drive of the game, a six-play, 45-yard march capped by quarterback Ray Weed’s 16-yard TD run, the first score relinquished this season by the Red Raiders. Ocean City has now outscored its opponents 170-6 on the year.Ocean City’s defense once again accounted for points, as it has in all four games. Midway through the first quarter, Rhodes chased down a bad snap that went over Weed’s head and recovered it in the end zone to give O.C. a 16-0 lead.On the last play of the quarter, Brian Beckman picked off Weed and ran it back 25 yards, just missing a pick-6, but setting up Wilson’s third score of the night.Early in the third quarter, O.C. went on an eight-play, 55-yard drive with Wilson accounting for 36 of them on five carries, and Mazzitelli chipping in with several big runs along the way and Wilson’s plunge sealing the rout.Game Notes: Brendan McGonigle had another strong kicking game, going 6-for-6 on extra points. On the Raiders’ first TD, Repetti sprinted out to the right, drawing in several defenders and found a wide open Schneider for the score. The big play of the drive was a 22-yard hookup with Beckman, who initially caught the ball for about an eight-yard gain but fought off two would-be tacklers to gain about 16 more yards after the catch.Ocean City now prepares for its biggest test yet on the season, a road contest in Richland next week against always tough St. Augustine Prep.Ocean City’s defense closes in on Absegami QB Ray Weed in the first quarter. Ocean City quarterback Joe Repetti hands off to Isaac Wilson for his third TD run of the night, while Ted Grimley (4) prepares to throw a block.last_img read more

The Fox Theatre Announces Month-Long 25th Anniversary Celebration, Starting With The Motet

first_imgBoulder, CO’s The Fox Theatre is getting set to rollout a full month’s worth of incredible shows in March to celebrate the venue’s 25th anniversary. The first of those shows to be announced will be hometown funk heroes The Motet on Friday, March 17th (St. Patrick’s Day). Earlier today, The Motet also announced a headlining show at Red Rocks Amphitheatre on June 2nd with Jurassic 5 and The California Honeydrops.Tickets for The Fox show go on-sale this Friday, December 16th at 10AM MDT via The Fox Theatre website. Special 2-day passes for the March show and Red Rocks performance will also be made available.The Motet @ Red Rocks – 7/22/2016 – “The Truth”:last_img read more

GRiZ Announces 2-Night Return To Red Rocks In July

first_imgThe news comes somewhat as a surprise, following last week’s social media campaign that teased a big change for GRiZ aka Grant Kwiecinski. The electronic producer posted videos and images across his social media accounts with the messaging: “it’s about time we talked” and “I’m gonna miss u guysssss.” The cryptic clues had many fans in a panic about his retirement, though later, it seemed as though “it’s about time we talked” referenced a recently released animated video and spoken word poem. Regardless, after clearing his social media and updating his profile pictures to an image of a blank piece of paper, while retirement may not be in GRiZ’s future (as confirmed by these newly announced Red Rocks dates), it seems clear that the producer may still be looking for a clean slate and new direction.[Photo: Ali Baker] Today, GRiZ announced his return to the iconic Colorado amphitheater, Red Rocks, after teasing the announcement yesterday with a promotional video posted. Like last year, the Boulder-based electronic producer and DJ will perform two shows—one with his live band and one as a more traditional solo performer—though the dates have been moved from early September to mid-summer, on July 13th and 14th, 2018. Last year, during his Red Rocks run, the funk/electronica producer debuted his live band to the world.No support has been announced for the show as of yet, though a limited number of pre-sale tickets are on sale now here, with the fan password being “GRIZRRX18”.last_img read more

McEwan recounts his missteps

first_imgIt would be hard to find a more witty, urbane, and insightful literary guest at Harvard than British writer Ian McEwan, whose novel “Amsterdam” (1998) won the Man Booker Prize, and whose “Atonement” (2001) was made into an Oscar-winning film.McEwan held an audience in thrall at Paine Hall Tuesday during an exploration of realism and its pitfalls in the creative process.McEwan has avoided magical realism in his work, saying, “All my writing life, I have refused to give my characters wings.” But hewing to realism can sometimes trip up a writer who delves, without true expertise perhaps, into the arcana of medicine, astronomy, and even auto mechanics.His lecture, “The Lever: Where Novelists Stand to Move the World,” was the inaugural event in a new series funded by the Rita E. Hauser Forum at the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard.The lever, McEwan explained, is one of the six “simple machines” revered by Renaissance science. (The others are the screw, pulley, inclined plane, wedge, and wheel and axle.) But the lever, described by the Greek scientist Archimedes in the third century BCE, seems to have special resonance for writers of modern realism. “Give me a place to stand, and I will move the Earth,” Archimedes said. And where else is the fact-bound novelist to stand, McEwan said, if not on the Earth?But facts are the rub. They may find their way into novels slightly askew, and readers with special expertise lead hapless writers back to reality. The Harvard lecture, McEwan promised, would be an accounting of “all the mistakes I have ever made in fiction” — including the letters from readers eager to correct him.He read passages from his fiction, evocations of places and people that seemed like dreams borne along on a carpet of facts. McEwan interleaved these selections with the dry, droll, detailed — and occasionally scolding — responses they elicited from expert readers.In “The Comfort of Strangers” (1981), he related, one character gazes out at a summer night sky in Venice and muses about the constellation Orion. After the novel was published, McEwan got a letter from the euphoniously named Felicity Belfield, an amateur astronomer from the Isle of Sark. “If you want to see Orion in the summer,” she wrote, “you must go to New Zealand.” He was chagrined, McEwan said. “I never knew I was turning the heavens around.”Some modernist writers avoid even little mistakes by doing deep research, said McEwan, including James Joyce, who obsessed over tidal charts, train schedules, and “every last detail.”Then again, he added, some mistakes should never be changed. Alfred Lord Tennyson, who had never seen a train before, described his first nighttime ride as “ringing down the grooves of change.” It is musical and symbolically apt but technically wrong. (Trains ride on the top of rails and not in grooves.)Other writers couldn’t care less, said McEwan. He cited a poem that mistakenly located penguins on a South African shoreline. “In my poem,” the poet said, “those penguins are there.”Then there was British writer William Golding, a Nobel laureate who was badgered for decades — often by schoolboys — regarding Piggy’s glasses in his celebrated novel “Lord of the Flies” (1954). If the spectacles corrected for farsightedness, and were therefore concave and spread light, how could they be used to start a fire? That hectoring science question, said McEwan, “was the burden of Golding’s life.”After McEwan wrote “Atonement,” a miffed artillery veteran of World War II wrote to point out that “on the double” was an Americanism, and that British soldiers of his day would have said “at the double.” Other mistakes can be “driven by sheer desire,” said McEwan. In a draft passage of his novel “Saturday” (2005), he had a neurosurgeon use a paintbrush, artistlike, to apply Betadine on a shaven skull. The fanciful image — off-key since you can’t autoclave a paintbrush — earned the novelist a reproving response from the physician-expert he had spent two years observing.Still other mistakes can lead to friendships of a sort, said McEwan. In “Saturday” he described a Mercedes Benz S500 as having a clutch, which it does not. That gaffe prompted a detailed reply from a “motoring journalist,” who characterized a mechanical gearbox as a “crude proletarian device” that would never appear in a car of this stature. A correspondence ensued. In the end, McEwan — then driving a 17-year-old car — knew just what to buy next.Over time, his interchanges with fact-sensitive readers became “a high form of engagement,” he said. The writers might be professional fact checkers, schoolboys, or just scolds, said McEwan, but “they knew the air of reality, the solidity of specification, is among the supreme virtues of the novel.”This contact with readers also reminded him of the human desire to break out of fiction’s collectivization of experience. “When Felicity Belfield writes me,” said McEwan tenderly, “she’s offering to add her own weight to my lever … and help me move the world by means of the high artifice of realism.”last_img read more

A family history of wartime heroism

first_imgThey weren’t personally threatened. They weren’t Jews, Gypsies, homosexuals, or any of the other groups targeted by Hitler’s death squads. And yet over a period of two years, 1939–40, Waitstill and Martha Sharp, a Unitarian minister and his wife from Wellesley, Mass., left their children and their safe home several times to save those who were in danger. Using fake documents and at great personal risk, the couple managed to rescue hundreds from the Nazis. Although the Sharps were not celebrated in their lifetimes, their heroism was honored posthumously in 2006, when they were named as “Righteous Among the Nations,” by Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Authority in Israel, only the second and third Americans of the more than 20,000 non-Jews so honored for risking their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust. (Martha is the only American woman.) A new PBS documentary, “Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War,” tells their story. On Tuesday, the film will be screened at 4 p.m. in the Sperry Room, Andover Hall, at Harvard Divinity School. A post-screening panel, at 5:45, will include the Sharps’ grandson, Artemis Joukowsky, who collaborated with documentarian Ken Burns on the film. A livestream of the event will also be available. The Gazette spoke with Joukowsky about the project.GAZETTE: How much did you know of your grandparents’ story when you were growing up?JOUKOWSKY: It was never talked about for many different reasons. I had never heard of the story until I received [an] assignment from my ninth-grade history teacher [to interview a relative] and my mom said, “Talk to your grandmother. She did some cool things during World War II.” Learning that story and getting to know her was a double win-win, it was the only A I ever got in high school. It really lit my fire to be interested in not just history but social justice in history.When [my grandmother] died, I was asked by my mom to go in the basement of her home and found 14 boxes of files of the people she rescued … These 14 boxes lighted my imagination. That was 1999. I knew that it had to be documented in a film. [These papers are now part of a collection kept at the Andover-Harvard Theological Library.]“When [my grandmother] died, I was asked by my mom to go in the basement of her home and found 14 boxes of files of the people she rescued …,” said Artemis Joukowsky, the Sharps’ grandson. Pictured are Martha and Waitstill Sharp. Courtesy of UUSC ArchivesGAZETTE: What your grandparents did took quite a toll on your family. Not only did they leave your mother and uncle, who were children, but they ended up divorcing.JOUKOWSKY: It is something that is still difficult in some ways. There is a sense of going and saving the world’s children but not taking care of a daughter or a son. The process of making a film involves recognizing that my grandparents felt my mom and uncle were fine and they had to rescue people who would die. For them, it was a hierarchy of needs.GAZETTE: How is this story relevant today?JOUKOWSKY: We have a worldwide refugee crisis, not just in Europe and not just in Syria, but all over the world: wealthy areas versus poor areas, and also women and children being victims of war. You look at what the Nazis did, leading to the death of 60 million people, and [you have] those numbers being eclipsed. Sixty-five million refugees is not good — all those children need to get an education and learn how to live in a civil society. We’re going to create a tremendous underclass. We have to address these issues. In some ways, the rebuilding of Europe and the fact that 1.5 million refugees are in Germany is positive — people can learn from their own mistakes and repair them in real time.Imagine if America had said in 1938, “We need a lot of people in Alaska. We’ll take 6 million Jews.” The world should know that immigration is the most positive way of growing your economy. It’s the most progressive thing you can do.GAZETTE: Besides this film, you work on media that raises awareness about people with disabilities. How does this relate?JOUKOWSKY: I have a form of muscular dystrophy called spinal muscular atrophy. Most people die before they’re 2 years old. I have a mild form of it — I require a wheelchair. I cannot stand very well. I will die of my disease before my normal life expectancy, but I’m 55 and still alive, so that’s pretty good. It’s all about how you chose to view your disability. My work is media projects that show that people with disabilities can play an active and equal role in the world today.I am a disabled filmmaker and I made this film with Ken Burns. [My] subjects touch on the issue of “difference.” If our lives are on a spectrum, then we’re all differently abled.People with disabilities … [experience] a tremendous marginalization. The capacity for engagement is not there, so we have to invent a new economy so they can bring their talents and their resources to the world. People with disabilities are a gift in that they teach us about other things in life. This is about embracing diversity, embracing tolerance, about seeing humans as having the same basic needs for respect and love and kindness and opportunity.SaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

Spanish courses connect students and local community

first_imgSpanish classes at Notre Dame do not take place exclusively in the classroom.Since 2010, the department for romance languages and literatures together with the Center for Social Concerns (CSC) has offered various community-based learning (CBL) Spanish courses, in which students participate in service in the South Bend community to complement what they learn in the classroom.“The people that [Notre Dame students] are working with in the community not only put a face to the numbers and to the stories — which is something that we’ve heard over and over again from the students — but [they] make it very real and very personal, and it gives a sense of urgency or importance to what it is they’re learning,” Rachel Parroquin, the director of Spanish CBL courses at Notre Dame, said. “It really inspires them to do something.”Parroquin said in each CBL course, a class of Notre Dame students partners with a specific organization. Students attend class meetings in a traditional classroom setting in addition to spending a minimum of 10 hours doing service with their partner organization.“That’s really where the power of the pedagogy comes in — combining the experiential with the academic content,” she said.The program has grown since the introduction of the first CBL course in 2010, Parroquin said, and various teachers in the department of romance languages and literatures have piloted classes aimed at encouraging student engagement with the community.Associate professional specialist Maria Coloma is teaching the CBL course being offered this fall, in which students are traveling to Washington High School to mentor local high school students.Sophomore Geralyn Smith, who is currently taking Coloma’s class, said relationship-building is a key component of the course.“It is about focusing on their academics and helping them with school, but we also want to foster a relationship, which is why we’re paired with them,” she said. “So it’s about helping them with school but it’s also about being kind of a mentor, someone they can look up to.”Smith said the course marks a significant departure from her other classes, which dedicate a majority of their time to academics.“With this class, we discuss real issues that are affecting the Latino community, and that’s a big change,” she said. “Because it’s not just about me academically, it’s not about me growing academically, it’s also about me growing socially and being able to play a part in and have an impact on a community that’s not my own.”Senior Zach Wiley, who is also enrolled in Coloma’s course, said the service component of the course enables students to better understand the academic content taught during class meetings.“It’s real world,” he said. “In a lot of my science classes, you have the lecture and then you have the lab, and Spanish classes are pretty much just lecture. This [course] is sort of like a lab component.”The interactive nature of CBL courses also helps students understand complex topics and improve language skills through conversation with native speakers, senior Ray’Von Jones, who has previously taken three CBL courses, said.“The thing about CBL courses is they add another dimension to what you’re learning,” Jones said. “You learn theories in class, you learn things in a more abstract way, [but] then once you’re in contact with the community it’s easier to connect the dots, and it kind of brings the theory to life.“ … I overcame a huge threshold when I started taking my first community-based class. Because it’s one thing to learn Spanish and speak it in class — it’s more scripted — but to be talking with people? It’s a lot more difficult, and it’s a quicker, more efficient way to learn a language.”Tags: CBL courses, community engagement, Community Service, Spanishlast_img read more