Thirteen families near Mayfield will be getting bottled water from the city of Wellington

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by James Jordan, Sumner Newscow — Beginning May 1, the 13 families near Mayfield will be getting bottled water from the city of Wellington, after the council approved an agreement between the city and KDHE at a special meeting Wednesday.The city was told recently it had to stop letting people use untreated water from water lines, a practice that had been in place since the 1950s. Wellington has been pumping millions of gallons of water off these properties for the past 50 years, and part of the deal was, the people would get free water, though it was untreated.The rule apparently came down from the federal government to the state, and the state has handed it down to the cities. Talks have been going on for some time, but nothing was done until the deadline neared.The city council approved an agreement that Mayor Shelley Hansel had been given from KDHE earlier in the week. The council discussed this at its last meeting and passed a resolution saying it would not cut people’s water off until a solution could be reached.It seems KDHE agreed to that — to some degree. The city will have to supply people with water or drinking and cooking, and the people can still use untreated water for other things, like bathing, washing clothes and outdoor use.KDHE plans to meet with the city in the next 30 days to work out a plan to find a permanent solution.Hansel said the city likely won’t have to pay any fines if it does what KDHE said, and works out a plan with KDHE to get a permanent fix in place.Hansel said the point of the resolution last week was to make sure people did not get their water cut off, but she also said she wants to be sure everyone is getting safe water. She said after talking with KDHE this week, she realized this has been an ongoing issue for 10 years or so, and that the state also dropped the ball to some degree.The council directed the city manager to get a plan in place to provide bottled water to those 13 families by May 1. They may use a private water distributor if they can find one locally, as opposed to the city taking it out there or having those people come and get the water.There is no date yet, but the city will meet with KDHE in Wellington, probably in a work session meeting. It should happen in early May, and Hansel said she wanted to invite the people affected to have input as well.Of the 13 families, not all are using the water for their homes, city manager Roy Eckert said. Some are using it only for outdoor purposes, such as stock watering. He was going to contact KDHE and find out if those people would need to be given water as well. Either way, he said he would find a way to get them water by the first of the month.Council member Jim Valentine brought up the point that the city had planned to install  a water line, and in 2015 it was on the Capitol Improvement Project list.Apparently no official action was taken, but at the time the city thought it would cost about $150,000. City officials, like the city manager, later found out it would cost possibly twice that much, and the plan was put on the back burner.Eckert said they had decided it would cost less to get individual wells dug than it would to put in the water line.But that is why they will have the meeting with KDHE, to go over all the possibilities. The plan that is to be worked out will have to include whether to do a water line or to provide wells for individual homes. Both are still possibilities.The council has expressed its desire to take care of the people who are using the city line that pumps raw water to the city water plant. The city gets a sizable portion of its water from wells on those properties, which comes to many millions of gallons. The deal in place for the last 50 years was that the city would provide free water in exchange for the water they were getting from wells on those properties.Follow us on Twitter.last_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *