Steelers Emmanuel Sanders Fined 50K For Faking Injury

Pittsburgh Steelers receiver Emmanuel Sanders was fined $50,000 by the NFL for faking an injury during a game in Cincinnati on Oct. 21.Sanders initially played coy in public comments about the incident, but in recent weeks has said the matter was being handled internally.Also fined on Friday by the league were Panthers safety Haruki Nakamura and Packers tight end Ryan Taylor, $21,000 each; Titans safety Michael Griffin, $20,000; Raiders cornerback Tyvon Branch, Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy, and Cardinals linebacker Quentin Groves, $15,750 each; Ravens LB Dannell Ellerbe, $10,000; Eagles quarterback Michael Vick, Colts cornerback Cassius Vaughn, and Steelers safety Will Allen, $7,875 apiece.During the Steelers-Bengals game, NBC announcers openly discussed their belief Sanders apparently was deliberately feigning an injury for the purpose of saving a timeout.Anderson said it found no evidence the Steelers, on an organization-wide basis, were instructing or condoning the faking of injuries for competitive purposes.“If I believed that to be the case, the discipline would be substantially more,” Anderson said. “Instead, it reflects the commissioner’s strong view that it is the responsibility of the club to insure that its players are familiar with and in compliance with the league’s competitive rules.”In an open letter to Sanders and Steelers general manager Kevin Colbert, Anderson cited video evidence to the contrary of Sanders’ contention that he was in severe pain while lying on the ground, before or after the play.Sanders sat out one play — a team trainer attended to him — and then returned to the game for the next play, a Pittsburgh punt. Anderson noted that Sanders outran his teammates and downed the ball.“The video of the play shows Sanders running swiftly and effortlessly toward the punted ball, and then leaving the field with no sign of discomfort,” Anderson wrote. “Sanders also played the rest of the game without difficulty.”The NFL sent out a memo to team general managers and coaches in September that said, “The Competition Committee deprecates feigning injuries.” The league reiterated it had the power to fine players, coaches or teams or even take away draft picks.This is the first punishment the league has handed out for faking an injury.When asked two days before his meeting with the league if he thought the NFL had a problem with faking, Sanders said “Not that I know of.” read more

Street signs to be installed in three Jamaican parishes  in January 2018

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Jamaica, November 13, 2017 – Montego Bay – Minister of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Desmond McKenzie, says the Government will commence a street-signage programme in three parishes in January 2018, which will herald the start of a nationwide beautification and community development initiative.“We will be rolling out the project in Manchester, Westmoreland and St. Thomas, and then get the necessary funds to take the street signs right across the country,” the Minister said, as he addressed a property tax town hall meeting on November 8 in Savanna-la-Mar, Westmoreland.He said this programme will address concerns that many communities across the island are hard to identify, as there are no signs.“Some of the work of the municipal corporations, when it comes to beautification, includes identifying communities.   There are many communities in Westmoreland (that) when you drive in them, you don’t even know the name of the roads because the street signs don’t exist,” the Minister noted.The Minister said the signage programme was conceptualised based on data gathered by the 2,700 youngsters across the island who were employed by the Ministry of Local Government and Community Development last summer to undertake audits of street lights and street signs.Mr. McKenzie appealed to citizens to pay their property taxes, as this is the only way the local authorities will be able to provide them with the basic services, amenities and infrastructure for modern-day living.   He reminded the audience that taxes are collected in all countries of the world, and Jamaica is no different.He said that while the Government has a responsibility to serve the nation, the citizens themselves “have to become partners with us in this mission”, adding that in excess of $16 billion is owed in arrears for property taxes island-wide.He congratulated landowners in Westmoreland, who have demonstrated an “encouraging level of compliance” over the last three years by making concerted efforts to pay the requisite taxes.   He said of the $607 million that was set as the Westmoreland target for the 2017/2018 financial year, more than $291 million has already been paid.“I find it difficult when people say they are not getting any benefit out of the taxes.   While there may be weaknesses in some of what we do, there has been significant improvement in service delivery in this country.   We are working hard to make a difference, but we can only do that if you buy into the reality that taxes are necessary in order for you to live in a decent and a clean country,” he said.last_img read more