Rose Bowl Competitors Fight for Same Outcome – A Cure

first_imgSports Rose Bowl Competitors Fight for Same Outcome – A Cure From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, December 18, 2014 | 2:06 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Top of the News Community News Subscribe EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. 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Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Business News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Reigning national college football champions, Florida State University (FSU) Seminoles will take on No. 2 Oregon (UO) Ducks in the Rose Bowl, Jan. 1, but the teams have a shared goal that trumps their quest for the 2015 College Football National Title – a cure against Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare and incurable blood disorder plaguing two high-profile families within these major college programs.FSU Head Football Coach, Jimbo Fisher and wife, Candi, have a 9-year-old son, Ethan, who was diagnosed with FA less than four years ago. Former UO President Dave Frohnmayer and wife, Lynn, have a 27-year-old daughter, Amy, with FA and have lost two other children to this deadly disease.This high-stakes football play-off game has brought these families of opposing teams, and coasts, together for the first time to fight the battle off the field. The Frohnmayers founded The Fanconi Anemia Research Fund (FARF) in 1989 to fund grants for critical FA efforts and to support affected families, and the Fishers created Kidz1stFund immediately following their son’s diagnosis to fight this disease through research.These are the only two FA research organizations in the country.“It’s a terrible fate our families share, but one we use to fuel our fight against FA,” said Coach Fisher. “With the nation’s attention on the Rose Bowl, we have both an opportunity and responsibility to raise awareness for a much more critical victory in our sights.”Over the past 25 years, FARF has raised more than $29 million to support families and fund over 100 doctors and researchers worldwide, all racing to find a cure. Since its inception, Kidz1stFund has donated $2.8 million directly to the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, the largest treatment center for FA patients in the country.“Because of these aggressive efforts, we’re beginning to find ways to combat this disease that was once a total mystery and an immediate death sentence for children,” said Dave Frohnmayer.Ethan and Amy are two of fewer than 1,000 people in the U.S. with FA. Nearly 100 percent of patients need high-risk bone marrow transplants before adulthood, and even then, survivors have an estimated median life span of only 33 years old.FSU President John Thrasher and interim UO President Scott Coltrane have spoken directly about this significant connection between the schools. “The Fisher and Frohnmayer families have all our support for their dedicated research efforts,” said Thrasher.Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, Inc. (FARF)Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, Inc. in 1989, to fund research into this disease and to provide support to affected families worldwide by medical referral, education, publications, and annual family meetings. To date, the Fund has raised more than $29 million. Fifty-six universities and institutions have received support from the Fund for almost 200 research projects to study FA. The Fund convenes an annual Fanconi Anemia Scientific Symposium at which researchers from around the world present the results of their research. To make a contribution or learn more, please visit www.fanconi.org or contact Laura Hays, PhD, at [email protected] or (541) 687-4658. Media materials may be obtained at www.fanconi.org/press.Kidz1stFundKidz1stFund was established in 2011 by FSU head football coach Jimbo Fisher and his wife, Candi, to raise awareness and funds in support of research to fight Fanconi anemia, a rare but serious blood disease that affects thousands of children each year, including their younger son, Ethan. To date, Kidz1stFund has given over $2.8 million to fund groundbreaking research at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital. To make a contribution or learn more about the fight, visit www.Kidz1stFund.com. Additional media materials including fact sheets, interviews, b-roll and other visual assets may be obtained on www.Kidz1stFund.com/press. 14 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it last_img read more

PREMIUMExperts warn of moral hazard, uncertainty as House plans to let BI supervises banks

first_imgFacebook Forgot Password ? LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here The House of Representatives’ proposal to bring back banking supervision to Bank Indonesia (BI) has drawn criticism as experts warn of possible moral hazard and regulatory uncertainty.In a draft revision of the 1999 and 2004 BI laws, the House’s Legislative Body (Baleg) proposed that the central bank take over the job of supervising banks from the Financial Services Authority (OJK). The gradual takeover process is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2023, at the latest.The OJK was established in 2011 to oversee the financial industry and it was modeled on the financial services regulatory structure that prevailed in the United Kingdom. It assumed the role of regulator and supervisor of banks in 2013, taking the responsibility from the central bank.The plan to return the role to the central bank will put the credibility of lawmakers and the government at stake, said U… Log in with your social account Google Linkedin Topics : OJK bank-indonesia Financial-Services-Authority BI-Law-revision banking-industry supervisionlast_img read more

H-DNL football: St. Bernard’s to take perfect record to Templeton

first_imgUndefeated St. Bernard’s will take its high-flying offense on the road this week when it heads a day’s drive south for a Friday night contest against the Templeton Eagles.The Crusaders (5-0) will enter the non-conference game coming off their bye-week — and it couldn’t have come at a better time.The 13-day rest period allowed Lane Thrap — the No. 2 receiver in terms of touchdowns (12) in the North Coast Section (not to mention No. 5 in the state) — to recover from an upper-body injury …last_img read more

Slugs likely this summer

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Something very small has benefited from the heavy rainfall that has played havoc with field crops statewide: the slimy and frequently hungry gray garden slug.Planting corns and soybeans early sometimes helps reduce the amount of damage from slugs because the crop has a chance to outpace the growth of the slug, whose appetite increases as it matures, said Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension.But with above average rainfall across the state and some late-season frosts, a significant number of farmers are planting — or replanting — corn and soybeans later in the growing season. And those emerging plants are tasty meals for the slithering bandits.This spring and summer might just offer the perfect conditions for slugs, including the gray garden slug, the species that typically creates the biggest problem for growers of field crops, Tilmon said.“We get the worst problems when we have very small plants combined with large slugs because they’re out there happily feeding on them,” Tilmon said. “That’s a bad combination.”Slugs tend to build up in fields that aren’t tilled, where they’re protected by the leftover remains of past years’ crops, Tilmon said. During the day, slugs can seek cover under past crop residue, taking advantage of the shade and extra layer of moisture. At night, they feast. Not only are the emerging plants vulnerable to slugs, but slugs can chomp away at seeds as well.They are not picky eaters and are willing to devour pretty much anything they can crawl onto: corn, soybeans, grain, forages and even weeds if a field does not have any crops growing on it.One of the more significant pests for Ohio’s soybean and corn growers, slugs can be easily overlooked in a field, said Andy Michel, an OSU Extension pest expert.Their eggs are slightly smaller than a BB and blend in well with the soil, Michel said. After hatching, they hide during the day, venturing out at night to seek food. As a result, a farmer may not be aware of the number of slugs in a field until after the damage is done.“I’ve seen holes in soybeans, gaps in rows and fields that needed to be replanted because of slugs,” Michel said.They do the most damage in late spring and early summer.“If you go out at dusk or after sunset with a flashlight, you might find them in the act,” Tilmon said.Besides holes in leaves, slugs can leave behind their trace, a trail of clear slime that shines when it dries.Like uninvited guests, slugs can be tough to get rid of. Growers should scout for slugs, particularly in areas where weeds thrive or where there are a lot of remnants of past years’ crops.A farmer with a serious slug problem can either till the soil to disrupt the slugs’ shelter or apply a pesticide with an active ingredient of either metaldehyde or chelated iron, Tilmon said. Insecticides do not kill them because slugs aren’t insects — they’re mollusks.One way to tell if a field has a slug problem is by leaving asphalt shingles in various parts of the field — ideally white ones that won’t attract the heat as much during the day — but will draw slugs if they’re around, Tilmon said. A grower can flip over the shingles and get an idea of how many slugs are hiding out in their field, then decide what to do about them.For more information, visit: go.osu.edu/slugsoncrops.last_img read more

Why Virtualization Stalls

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#Server Virtualization#solution-series alex williams A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market How an enterprise approaches virtualization differs in the way it has traditionally deployed business critical applications.The expectations for deploying Tier 1 applications prepared the enterprise for a lengthly endeavor. It was never done piecemeal. It involved the entire organization. Why? The applications changed the roles that people played. Business processes were affected. It had to be viewed holistically.But in today’s world, virtualization is often stalled because companies decide to take a “let’s start small,” approach.A post on CRN takes a deep look at the issue of piecemeal strategies:But the most common virtualization stall scenario begins when organizations start from the bottom up with virtualization, deploying it in piecemeal fashion for small, specific workloads. The cost benefits become quickly apparent, and companies increase the scope of their virtualization efforts, but they often fail to account for the business impact the technology can exert on operations, particularly in terms of roles, responsibilities and accountability.“No one would ever say, ‘Let’s deploy an enterprise application from SAP or Oracle (NSDQ:ORCL) for a small point solution, and if it runs well we’ll expand it.’ But virtualization is deployed that way every single day,” said Steve Kaplan, vice president of data center virtualization practices at INX, a Houston, Texas-based solution provider.The too-often result is an enterprise that runs short on resources. There’s an underestimation. The virtualization becomes ineffective without proper planning. Often, companies will end up buying more servers to make up for the poor performance.Another leading factor is the lack of interest in virtualizing Tier 1 apps. As CRN points out, the problem is usually associated with concerns that the virtualization technology can’t handle it. That’s despite the numerous examples of virtualization working just fine with Tier 1 apps.The answer? Treat virtualization as an enterprise deployment. Realize that it will force changes in the organization. Roles will shift. Processes will change. And in the end, savings will be realized.last_img read more

9 months agoSpalletti: Inter Milan in Coppa Italia to win it

first_imgSpalletti: Inter Milan in Coppa Italia to win itby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveInter Milan coach Luciano Spalletti says they’re in the Coppa Italia to win it.Inter meet Benevento in the round of 16 on Sunday.“As we saw last year, these games can hold hidden dangers, but the team is focused and learned from that experience,” said Spalletti.“We have a stronger mentality now and will try to improve it further in this match. Benevento boss Cristian Bucchi has experience now and is very good at setting his team out, so his type of side can cause problems.“We also saw in Cup competitions in England and France that big clubs can be surprised by minnows. Benevento eliminated Udinese in order to get here, so in one-off matches, the gap between teams can be wiped out.”On winning the Coppa, he added: “It is certainly an objective. This is probably the simplest to achieve, because there are fewer games on the way to the Final. Big clubs take part and it’ll be tough, but a side like Inter must aim for victory.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Tennis And The Olympics Make An Awkward Match

We’re on the ground in Rio covering the 2016 Summer Olympics. Check out all our coverage here.Olympic tennis should be as, well, grand as a Grand Slam. The world’s best players show up with a chance to win hardware for their countries — and without making a yearlong commitment. They get to hang with other great athletes in the Olympic Village. And they only get one chance every four years — not four chances every year. That makes it especially precious for players who are sidelined with injury just before the games, as Rafael Nadal was in 2012 and as Roger Federer is this year. The reality, though, is a bit more flawed. The necessities of the national nature of the Olympics imposes restrictions on what is otherwise mostly an individual sport. And that robs the Olympics tennis event of some of its top players and teams — and that’s not counting the stars who blamed Zika when they withdrew.No country gets more than four players in each of the men’s and women’s 64-player singles draws — half the size of major draws. That limit means half of France’s eight men in the Top 50 don’t get a shot at individual glory. Meanwhile, to improve regional representation, Ons Jabeur of Tunisia (ranked No. 188 at the time the entry list was finalized) and Stephanie Vogt of Liechtenstein (No. 274) got into the women’s draw. At majors, they’d usually have to try to earn their way in through qualifying.At least in singles, players are competing as they usually do. On the tours, some of the best doubles teams are paragons of multinational cooperation — a former pairing of an Indian man and a Pakistani teammate inspired tennis fans in both their countries. Part of what makes tennis great, if you’re into individual agency for athletes, is that even when players team up on tour, they do so by choice. They choose whom to partner and whom to dump — leading to a fun round of musical chairs and attendant gossip in each offseason. The Olympics, though, forces teammates to split up. Four of the top 10 women’s teams in the world, including the very best one, pair players from different countries. So do six of the top 10 men’s teams. There isn’t a ranking for mixed doubles, yet just three of the 16 majors since the last Olympics were won by a man and woman from the same country. Yet all those players who normally partner with someone from a different country had to find someone else to play with in Rio de Janeiro.The bigger problem with mixed at the Olympics is how easy it is to medal once you’ve qualified: Just 16 teams enter (after having qualified by making it into one of the other draws and then signing up for mixed in Rio), so it takes just two wins to reach the semifinals. Win one of the next two matches and you’re on the podium.Partly because of all the limitations, especially on top players who don’t qualify because their country’s talent pool is too deep, the tours stopped offering ranking points for wins in this year’s Olympic event. John Isner, the highest ranked American man, cited that as a major factor in his decision to skip Rio. Isner and other opt-outers have been feasting on depleted competition at the tour events. Isner got 150 ranking points for beating three players outside the top 50 in Atlanta last week — 150 more than he would’ve gotten if he’d won the gold medal in Rio. Ranking points, not gold, are the currency on tour, yielding direct entry to events and higher seeds that offer safer passage through the draw.The Olympic men’s singles draw may have lost other stars to early upsets because of their best-of-three-set format until the final. Novak Djokovic, who has won just about every important title except a gold medal, lost his first match in straight sets to Juan Martin del Potro. At a major he would have had a chance to try to come back — a thrilling prospect whether or not he would have pulled it off.I asked the International Tennis Federation, which helps organize the event, for a response to my criticisms. David Haggerty, president of the ITF, said in a statement sent through a spokesman: “The ITF is happy with the overall format of the Olympic Tennis Event, which presents a unique opportunity for players to represent their countries in individual competition. The current format ensures a strength of entry alongside a diversity of nations that reflects the universality of our sport.” He added that the draw size and number of sets are constrained by the desire to limit the event to a little over a week so players can get back on tour, and so that they can enter singles, doubles and mixed without undue burden.I’m not arguing, as many do, that tennis shouldn’t be in the Olympics.1Nor is it a plea on behalf of ESPN, the owner of this website and the broadcaster of the U.S. Open but not of the Olympics. All of the sport’s top players in recent years have competed passionately for their countries and have medaled in 2008 or 2012, or both: Serena and Venus Williams, Maria Sharapova, Victoria Azarenka, Djokovic, Federer, Nadal, Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka. I watched many of them at the London games in 2012 and enjoyed the novelty of watching singles stars playing doubles, wearing country uniforms and bringing lots of new colors to the usually staid Wimbledon aesthetic. And no one who watched the Djokovic-del Potro epic, or saw both players’ tears afterwards, would prefer it had never happened. It’s just a reminder that when the Olympic format is forced on top of an established sport’s pre-existing structure, flaws and awkwardness are inevitable. Tennis is an individual sport and is at its best when players — and doubles pairs — are free to compete for themselves. read more

Five things Ohio State fans should take away from Big Ten Media

OSU football coach Urban Meyer answers questions from the media at the 2014 Big Ten Media Days July 29 in Chicago.Credit: Tim Moody / Lantern sports editorIt’s long been understood that championships are not won or lost behind the podium.That being said, there is, however, plenty that fans can glean from what a coach or player might say at events like the Big Ten Media Days, which took place on Monday and Tuesday in Chicago.Here are five things that fans can take away from the comments of the Ohio State representatives who took part in the 2014 Big Ten Media Days.1. The OSU defensive line has historic potentialFollowing breakout seasons from senior defensive lineman Michael Bennett and sophomore defensive lineman Joey Bosa, the OSU defensive front could be one of the best coach Urban Meyer has ever laid his eyes on.“2006 was our best defensive line,” Meyer said, referring back to his time at the University of Florida. “If they all perform and stay healthy, this one could be on that level.”For reference, that 2006 defensive line that Meyer referred to boasted defensive end Jarvis Moss, the 17th overall pick of the 2007 NFL Draft to the Denver Broncos, and defensive end Derrick Harvey, the 8th overall pick of the 2008 NFL Draft to the Jacksonville Jaguars, both of whom helped Florida to beat OSU in the 2007 National Championship Game.If Meyer believes it, Bennett does too.“The fact that coach Meyer said it means that it’s pretty real,” Bennett said following Meyer’s comparison. “But as much as we have the potential to be it, potential doesn’t mean anything if you don’t do it, so we have to keep working.”2. Braxton Miller is the undoubted face of the Buckeyes and has a lot on his mind heading into his final seasonAs if there was any doubt who the most important player on the OSU roster was heading into Monday morning’s press conferences at Big Ten Media Day, Meyer removed all doubt.Without prompting or without a single question tossed his way, Meyer’s first comment addressed his senior quarterback: Braxton Miller.“Our quarterback, I know I’ll get asked that question, is ready to go,” Meyer said. “He’s full-speed, in the best shape of his life.”While Miller may be the face of Big Ten football, having won both the Big Ten offensive player and quarterback of the year the past two seasons, the quarterback feels as if injuries derailed what he believes might have been a Heisman-caliber 2013 season.“It could’ve been a different situation at the end of the season,” Miller said. “I fell off the Heisman radar, injury wise. That’s what happens, you miss a couple of games and your name gets quickly pushed aside.”Health may not necessarily be in his control, but Miller is certainly using last season’s happenings, as well as added talent around him, to push his name back into the national limelight.“I’ve been in the Heisman race the last two years, so I have to take advantage of what we’ve got in front of me this year,” Miller said. “If I’m in the Heisman situation again, hopefully, I get to walk across that podium and accept that award.”Ultimately, however, Miller said that following his tumultuous, four-year career at OSU, rather than being remembered as a Heisman Trophy winner, his goal is more team based.“Being in the situations I overcame as a freshman and sophomore, it’s not easy,” Miller said. “I just want to go out with a nice run this year and be known as a champion.”3. Miller already knows the targets that could elevate him to those Heisman heightsWith the Heisman talk lingering around No. 5, Miller seems to have developed quite the chemistry with a few potential receiving targets, starting with senior tight end Jeff Heuerman.“Them guys is 6’6, 260, man, you know you can’t miss those targets,” Miller said. “They’re a mismatch for any linebacker, any corner, any safety, so I’m going to make sure they get that ball early this year.”While the tight ends seem to be the primary targets for Miller, and therefore for opposing defenders as well, Miller’s favorite wideouts seem to be under-the-radar players who haven’t quite made an impact for the Buckeyes thus far.Miller thinks that some of his receivers will emerge from the bottom of the depth chart and become playmakers for the Buckeyes this fall.“Corey Smith, Mike Thomas, the guys on the outside, ” Miller said. “Those are the guys who are going to make some people like, ‘wow, where have these guys been at?” and it’s going to be fun.”Miller isn’t alone in his belief in his receivers, however.Coach Meyer, long a detractor of the receivers at OSU, finally seems to be confident in the pass-catchers to the outside.“I’ll be disappointed now if the receivers aren’t able to carry their own weight,” Meyer said.4. An unproven offensive line remains a huge concern for the BuckeyesA season after losing four starting offensive linemen, one of whom was a captain, the Buckeyes are searching for answers on the line.In his opening remarks to the media on Monday Meyer made it clear that the protection up-front is alarming.“The offensive line is No. 1,” Meyer said of his concerns heading into the new season. “I was a little disappointed with what happened in the spring. We just didn’t see the growth we would like to see.”If the offensive line is to grow from a weakness to a strength, who will lead the charge?Meyer believes it is the veterans that will ultimately decide the direction of the group.“Chase Farris, Antonio Underwood, Jacoby Boren, the new guy from Alabama Chad Lindsay, Darryl Baldwin… there’s a common theme there,” Meyer said, listing the offensive linemen who’ve yet to make a true impact for the Buckeyes. “They’re all nice players, nice people, who’ve been around for a while and haven’t played, so we have to get something out of them.”5. Despite glaring uncertainty, hope springs eternal for the new OSU pass defenseRanked 112th out of the 125 FBS teams in terms of pass defense, the OSU defensive backfield was a disappointment for the Buckeyes last season, calling for a revamping.Meyer brought in former Arkansas defensive coordinator Chris Ash to oversee the defensive remodeling, and thus far Meyer seemed to be pleased with the complete overhaul.“Chris Ash has done an admirable job installing a brand new pass defense,” Meyer said in his Monday presser. “We completely have blown up and started from scratch an area that we were not very strong in.”Bennett has seen the merits of the move as well, but feels that the play of the defensive backfield is impacted by the defensive front as well.“I feel like we’re a lot more aggressive,” Bennett explained. “The DB’s are a lot more aggressive. The d-line needs to get to the quarterback more or else we’re going hang the DB’s out to dry.”With the new defensive schemes of Ash under wraps and a potentially top-rated defensive line ready to contribute, the defensive backfield may be headed in the right direction, but is still a giant unknown heading into training camp. read more

Womens gymnastics Meredith Paulicivic hired as new head coach

After serving as assistant coach for the University of Utah’s women’s gymnastics program, Meredith Paulicivic will now take the reins of Ohio State’s team, the university announced Tuesday.The hiring of Paulicivic comes nearly a month after former women’s gymnastics head coach Carey Fagan was promoted to assistant athletics director for OSU.“I am thrilled to be named head coach at The Ohio State University,” Paulicivic said in a statement. “It’s a prestigious honor to lead this program and opportunities like this do not come around often.”Paulicivic helped lead the Utes to a Pac-12 team championship in 2017 and fifth-place finish in the NCAA championships. She served as the primary vault coach while at Utah.Prior to her time with Utah, she was the assistant coach at Arizona in 2015 and served as a head coach of a club program in the Southern California Elite Gym from 2007-2014, and assistant coach from 1997-2006. While coaching at SCEGA, she coached Rachel Tidd, a three-year U.S. National Team member and won a bronze medal with the U.S. World Championships team in 2001.During her playing career at Utah, she was a three-time on vault All-American. She competed for a pair of Utah NCAA championship-winning teams in 1992 and 1994. read more