New Medical Study Finds Music Can Alleviate Cancer Patients’ Symptoms

first_imgThe spiritually healing properties of music are widely discussed and recognized, but according to a new study from Drexel University, there is significant evidence that music intervention treatments help alleviate medical symptoms in cancer patients, from anxiety to pain to fatigue, while also increasing their overall quality of life. Led by Joke Bradt, PhD, an associate professor at Drexel’s College of Nursing and Health Professions, a team of scientists conducted a systematic review of studies that examined the impacts of music therapy (a personalized music experience offered by trained music therapists) and music medicine (listening to pre-recorded music provided by a doctor or nurse) on physical and psychological outcomes in people with cancer. Explains Dr. Bradt, “We found that music therapy interventions specifically improve patients’ quality of life. These are important findings as these outcomes play an important role in patients’ overall well-being.”The team examined fifty-two (52) different trials in the review, consisting of a total of 3,731 participants with cancer, with twenty-three (23) classified as “music therapy” and twenty-nine (29) classified as “music medicine interventions.” Overall, one of the most impactful findings was that “music interventions” of all kinds resulted in a moderate-to-strong reduction of patients’ anxiety.For pain reduction, researchers found a large treatment benefit, and for fatigue, they found small-to-moderate treatment effects. However, when comparing the merits of the two different types of music interventions, they found that, in terms of quality of life benefits, “music therapy” is more effective than “music medicine.”Dr. Bradt explains that both kinds of music interventions “play an important role in cancer care, but we didn’t quite know yet which interventions may be best suited for which type of outcome…We hope that the findings of this review will encourage health care providers in medical settings to seriously consider the use of music therapy in the psychological care of people with cancer.”While there is still a lot to learn about the subject, the positive effects of music interventions on cancer patients are an exciting are an exciting development in science’s ongoing fight against the disease. [via Science Daily]last_img read more

New legal problems for owner of Powder River Basin mines

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Casper Star-Tribune:The CEO that obtained Wyoming’s Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr coal mines last year is being sued for alleged unpaid royalties in Appalachia, the second lawsuit that Jeff Hoops’ West Virginia-based company, Revelation Energy, is facing in under a year.Hoops formed Blackjewel LLC, a sister company to Revelation, to take over the Wyoming mines in 2017. The latest lawsuit is one of a number of troubles the Eastern businessman has encountered since becoming one of Wyoming’s coal producers.According to court documents filed in the Western District of Virginia, Pocahontas Resources LLC is seeking nearly a half million dollars in royalties and interest from Revelation based on allegations Hoops’ firm committed fraud.Pocahontas asserts Revelation is being underhanded in its reporting of coal sales. It has asked for a slew of documents from Hoops’ company to prove its claim, much of which the company has refused to provide. Pocahontas filed a request to compel Revelation to release that information earlier this month. The judge had not responded as of Tuesday.Hoops has hit a few snags since arriving in the Powder River Basin.Blackjewel was delayed in obtaining leases for Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr until Hoops addressed outstanding environmental offenses at his Eastern coal mines. Blackjewel has yet to obtain permits to mine in Wyoming, though Hoops said Blackjewel has the required reclamation bonds in-hand and would seek permits this week, a claim he also made in an email to the Star-Tribune in February.The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality has not yet received those applications, a spokesman for the department said Monday.More: Second lawsuit entangles Wyoming’s newest coal producer New legal problems for owner of Powder River Basin mineslast_img read more